Mildenburg Castle

Miltenberg, Germany

The Archbishops of Mainz had the Mildenburg castle built at the end of the 12th century to secure their powerful position and to serve as a customs office.  Around 1200, the castle keep was added, the first official reference dates to 1226. Rather diverse periods in history affected the castle: extending, capturing, damaging and reconstructing.

Mildenburg the seat of the Oberamtmann, the Archbishop's local administrator until 1803. It then passed to the Princes of Leiningen before Carl Gottlieb Horstig purchased it in 1825. It now houses a museum of icons and contemporary art. The castle’s inner ward once held the Teutonenstein, a 5 m-tall sandstone column found on Greinberg, the inscription of which is still a puzzle to this day.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.miltenberg.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Don Andreas Panza (2 months ago)
Habe im August 3 Nächte dort verbracht. Einfach nur gut, mit allem Komfort: Zimmer, Essen und Getränke! Super Chef, super Angestellte. Haben immer ein Auge am Gast. So muss Service, jawoll, meine Damenunherrn! Wenn man sich einfach wohlfühlen will, sollte man da hin, zu den Pilhauers im Hotel / Restaurant Mildenburg und dem Café Gingko!
Eitan Mardiks (2 years ago)
Good price performance
Martin Rudat (3 years ago)
Nice small hotel, Biergarten and Restaurant. Very friendly owners.
Lars Dahlenburg (3 years ago)
The location is great, the rooms are looking good and the service is awesome. We were even allowed to book at 1or2 am.
Abid Mushtaq (6 years ago)
Nice staff n v nice view n v near to altesstadt. Economical for einzelzimmer.
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