Dilsberg Castle

Dilsberg, Germany

Dilsberg Castle is a castle on a hill above the River Neckar. The castle was built by the counts of Lauffen in the 12th century. In the 13th century it became the main castle for the counts. In the 14th century it became part of the Electorate of the Palatinate and received town rights in 1347. During the Thirty Years" War, the castle was considered impregnable until Imperial forces under Tilly took the castle in 1622 after a long siege.

In 1799, French forces tried and failed to storm the castle. A 46-metre-deep well helped keep the defenders supplied during this assault. In the 19th century the castle fell into ruin and was used as a quarry. Today the castle and its town are a tourist attraction and are administered by the Staatliche Schösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, attracting thousands of visitors.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

עמרי שליבק (13 months ago)
Beautiful village, very well preserved and old. There's a great view to the valley and mountains around.
Cengiz Deniz (13 months ago)
You can feel the old City atmosphere very nicely
Ayon Dubey (14 months ago)
Beautiful, country side,old town awesome hike and bike ride
Sav A (16 months ago)
A great place to walk around and brilliant views. 2€ to go round the ruins and the underground corridor is a great price.
Nikhil Gaikwad (17 months ago)
Just a leisure place to trek. Trail is not that difficult. At ticket counter you can ask for keys a tunnel which is the best part of this Castel.
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