Beuerberg Abbey, dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, was founded in about 1120 by Count Otto of Eurasburg; the church was dedicated in 1127. It was damaged by fire in 1294 and again in 1330, when the library and archives were largely destroyed. It was a small house for most of the Middle Ages, but gained in numbers during the reforms originating from the monastery at Indersdorf of the mid 15th century. It suffered a collapse during the late 15th century and the first half of the 16th century, after which it experienced something of a revival.

The abbey was sacked during the Thirty Years' War, but was rebuilt as early as the 1630s in the Baroque style by either Isaak Paader or Hans Krumpper. It became a part of the Lateran Congregation in 1710, when the prior was elevated to the rank of abbot, and more new building took place, starting in 1729. Thereafter it was a centre for scholarship and historical study. It was dissolved in 1803 in the course of the secularisation of Bavaria.

The last abbot, Paul Hupfauer, chief librarian of the Electors of Bavaria, was appointed Library Commissioner in 1802 and during secularisation secured the transfer of many hundreds of books and manuscripts to the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (Bavarian State Library) and to Munich University library. The abbey church became the parish church.

In 1835 the Visitandines, known also as the Salesian Sisters, from the Visitandine house at Dietramszell, acquired and re-settled the premises. Between 1846 and 1938 they ran a girls' school and a home for nursing mothers, and afterwards an old people's convalescent home.

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Details

Founded: 1120
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

WOLFGANG WALTER LEDERER (13 months ago)
Newly restored church. ORGAN SOUNDS WONDERFUL.
Hans-Dieter Gintar (Hannes) (13 months ago)
Was there for the first time on the occasion of a church wedding. Very nice church (Peter and Paul)! A young pastor carried out the wedding ceremony in a very pleasant way, for him it was the first, that is, it was a completely successful premiere!
Helmut (13 months ago)
The monastery is always worth a visit. The monastery garden is terrific.
Joseph Kainz (15 months ago)
The chapel is now completely renovated. Very nice.
Alexander Thal (16 months ago)
Nice monastery
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