Gars Abbey was founded in 768 by the cleric Boso from Salzburg for Tassilo III, Duke of Bavaria. For centuries it belonged to the archbishopric of Salzburg. The Augustinian Canons erected the present monastery building after 1122. In 1128 Bishop Conrad I of Salzburg transferred the monastery to the Augustinian Canons.

In 1648 the Swedes pillaged and devastated the town and the monastery. Under Provost Athanasius Peitlhauser the monastery was rebuilt between 1657 and 1659. The monastery wings and the Church of the Assumption were renovated by Italian artists to their present form. The pilaster church was rebuilt after 1661, one of the first Baroque churches in the region. The painted cast stone Pieta on a side altar dates from 1430, and was formerly the main altar of the church. The monastery is interesting for the relics of the martyr Felix. Ceiling paintings and an altar show the importance of this saint to the monastery.

In 1803 the Augustinian Canons were expelled as part of the Bavarian secularization program. The buildings and inventory were sold to private individuals. In 1855 the Redemptorists showed an interest in Gars Monastery, and in 1858 they formally re-opened the monastery. Between 1873 and 1894 under the Kulturkampf only three fathers and brothers were allowed to remain. After the monastery was restored in 1894 the first missionaries were sent to Brazil.

As of 2013 the monastery housed about 16 brothers and 13 priests. The brothers follow various professions including work as bakers, butchers, gardeners, carpenters and tailors. The Fathers work as ward missionaries, helping in the surrounding communities and in education. The monastery has a plant nursery that is well known in the region.

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Details

Founded: 768 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Franz K. (7 months ago)
Very nice church with good acoustics.
Whomst Pussyslayer69 (8 months ago)
Full of fun to eat, but unfortunately you cannot enjoy the food when you are out as a schoolboy, otherwise you will be bullied by Franzi from 9b. ?
Tilman Boehlkau (13 months ago)
The monastery church is currently being renovated, so it looks a bit mixed up. In addition, it is pretty gloomy inside for a baroque church, although the weather was perfect on September 27th, 2020 ...
Birgit Hoerburger-Koller (2 years ago)
Very pleasant for advanced training. The kitchen - so hard!
Dietmar Wuttke (2 years ago)
An impressive monastery that radiates peace and reflection. Colorful and splendid charisma. The visit to the monastery garden is worthwhile for every plant lover. The choice and variety is stunning. The gardeners have an answer to every question and are very friendly. Every greenhouse can be visited.
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