Landshut Residence

Landshut, Germany

In 1536 Louis X, Duke of Bavaria laid the foundation stone for a new residence in the inner city of Landshut. It was begun in German Renaissance style under the architect Bernhard Zwitzel from Augsburg. During a journey to Italy the duke got the inspiration for an additional palace.

Behind the German building, close to the river Isar, the so-called 'Italian building' was constructed from 1537 to 1543 in Italian Renaissance style with a spacious courtyard and the palace chapel. It was modeled in particular after the Palazzo Te in Mantua, and was the first Italian style palace erected north of the Alps. Both buildings were connected by two wings. The paintings in the rooms were created by the Germans Hermanus Posthumus, Hans Bocksberger the Elder and Ludwig Refinger, while the stucco was done by Italian artists.

When Count William of Birkenfeld-Gellnhausen, who became later the first Duke in Bavaria, resided in the palace from 1780 onwards the facade of the German building was altered in French Neo-classical style and the so-called 'Birkenfeld Rooms' were constructed. These rooms were decorated again with early wallpaper, when Crown Prince Ludwig lived here in the early 19th century, in the course of his studies in Landshut. These rooms are today a part of the Residence Museum, together with the halls of the Italian building.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1536
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angelika S (17 months ago)
Schönes Museum in historischen, gut erhaltenen und gepflegten Gemäuer mit ca 7500 Jahre Geschichte der Stadt und umliegender Region. Der Innenhof lädt zum Verweilen ein.
Hildegard Strehler (18 months ago)
Die Veranstaltungen Residenz Festspiele sind immer sehr schön. Jedes Jahr wieder.
Klaus Riedel (2 years ago)
Sehr interessante Lokal-Historie!
A G (3 years ago)
علي هادي (5 years ago)
Nice
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Soave Castle

Soave castle was built in 934 to protect the area against the Hungarian invasions. It was remodelled by Cansignorio of the Scaliger family in the mid-1300s. in 1365 Cansignorio had the town walls erected and the Town hall was built in the same year.

The castle underwent various vicissitudes until, having lost its strategic importance, it was sold on the private market in 1596. In 1830 it was inherited by Giulio Camuzzoni who restored the manor and in particular the surroundings walls (with is twenty-four towers), the battlements and living-quarters.

Soave castle is a typical medieval military edifice, commanding the neighbourhood of the city from the Tenda Hill. It comprises a mastio (donjon) and three lines of walls forming three courts of different size. The outer line, with a gate and a draw bridge, is the most recent, built by the Venetians in the 15th century. It houses the remains of a small church from the 10th century.

The second and larger court, the first of the original castle, is called della Madonna for a fresco portraying St. Mary (1321). Another fresco is visible after the door leading to the inner court, and portrays a Scaliger soldier. The mastio is the most impressive feature of the castle. Bones found within showed it was used also as prison and place of torture.

The House called del Capitano (the Scaliger commander) houses Roman coins, weapons parts, medals and other ancient remains found during the most recent restoration. Adjacent is a bedroom with a 13th-century fresco with St. Mary and Madeleine and a dining room with medieval kitchenware. Another room houses the portraits of the most famous Scaliger figures: Mastino I, Cangrande, Cansignorio and Taddea da Carrara, wife of Mastino II; the portrait of Dante Alighieri testify an alleged sojourn of the poet in the castle.