St. Martin's Church

Landshut, Germany

The Church of St. Martin in Landshut is a Brick Gothic landmark of Landshut. It is the tallest church in Bavaria, and the tallest brick building and church in the world.

In the year 1204, the town of Landshut was founded by Duke Louis I, Duke of Bavaria. He established Castle Trausnitz and built a small church on the site of the present-day St. Martin's Church. Construction of the current church began around 1389, under the architect Hans von Burghausen. It took about 110 years to finish the church. During this period, five architects managed the building site. It took 55 years just to build the tower. The church was finally dedicated in 1500.

The choir elbow cross of 1495 has an overall length of 8 m. The crucifix is one of the largest of the late Gothic period. The body was carved from a lime tree trunk and has a length of 5.80 m and an arm width of 5.40 m. Made by Michael Erhard, it was installed in 1495.

Other important works of art in the church include the high altar, the hexagonal pulpit carved from a single stone, and the 'rose wreath/ring Madonna' (about 1520), created by Hans Leinberger and considered one of his most important works of art.

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Details

Founded: 1389-1500
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniela Tudosescu (2 years ago)
In renovation, beautiful organ
Mohammad Azroun (2 years ago)
A wonderful Church, pure Art..
Duke Fernandez (2 years ago)
This is the landmark of Landshut, and there are less chances of anyone missing it from any part of town centre. The church is made of bricks, and 2nd tallest brick structure in the world. As with most churches in Bavaria and to most of Germany, the architecture style is Gothic. It has got a huge crucifix hanging from the roof directly above the altar. For me it was the biggest indoor cross I had seen. It's a good time to see all through year around, and gives Landshut Town Centre a definitive face. It does go without saying that visiting the church during mass is not allowed. A must see place in Landshut.
Markus Neumann (3 years ago)
Amazing church made entirely of bricks. An architectural wonder, as they still don't know, why it actually lasted for so long. Currently there are scaffolds set up inside to work on the windows. But it is still worth the visit.
Prathap Ghorpade (3 years ago)
Nice church, this was during my second vist to Freising. I had gone with one of my friend who stays here and he was explaining about some fest I don't remember when this will happen in the year but his comments were this will be worth seeing. So if anyone of you planning to visit this place do search for this fest and see if you will around during the same time
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