Plankstetten Abbey

Plankstetten, Germany

Plankstetten Abbey was founded in 1129 as a private monastery of the bishops of Eichstätt by Count Ernst of Hirschberg and his brother Gebhard of Hirschberg, Bishop of Eichstätt. The Romanesque crypt remains from the time of the foundation.

After the decline in monastic standards in the 15th century, the abbey was reformed by Abbot Ulrich IV Dürner (1461–94), who also founded the brewery. The abbey was badly damaged during the German Peasants' War (1525) and again in the Thirty Years' War (1618–48).

Major buildings works in the Baroque style were undertaken from the end of the 17th century. Under Abbot Romanus Dettinger (1694–1703), he created the entrance gateway with the abbot's lodging above it, the Prelates' Hall and the Banqueting Hall, as well as the corner tower on the way to the inner courtyard. The next abbot, Dominikus II Heuber (1704–11), continued the building works with the move of the sacristy and the construction of the new brewery (now the library).

Later in the century, Abbot Dominikus IV Fleischmann (1757–92) undertook the refurbishment of the abbey church. The crossing chapels are due to him; their stucco work was carried out by Johann Jakob Berg, stucco master to the court of Eichstätt. Dominikus IV was also responsible for the guesthouse opposite the main gateway.

In 1806, in the course of the secularisation of Bavaria, the monastery was dissolved and the buildings and estates auctioned off. As early as 1856, there were plans to re-found the abbey, but these came to nothing, as the government authorities refused to give the necessary consents.

Finally, in 1904, thanks to the financial support of the Barons Cramer-Klett, Plankstetten was re-settled as a priory of Scheyern Abbey and was raised again to the status of abbey in 1917. In 1958, a 'Realschule' with a boarding house was opened in Bavaria. The school closed in 1988. This caused the abbey to re-examine their role and possible options, and the community now runs a training centre, a monastery shop, a farm, a nursery for plants, a butchery and a bakery, which have been organic since 1994. The boarding facilities are now used as a guesthouse.

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Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Herbert Fieder (2 years ago)
Kommen hier jedes Jahr zum Erntedank Herr. Allein schon wegen dem Ochsenbraten vom Spieß. Das Ambiente passt dann auch so richtig dazu.
Elke Delert-thomas (2 years ago)
Man kann da gut kaffeetrinken und essen und trinken Außerdem gibt es da ein kleines Büchergeschäft da kann man gut stöbern Es gibt auch einen kleinen Tante Emma laden und ein dritte Welt laden. Was schön ist ich durfte da meinen Dackel mit rein nehmen. Würde ich auf jeden Fall weiter empfehlen man kann da auch sehr schön spazieren gehen
Stefan H (2 years ago)
Hier kann man lecker essen und es gibt auch einen gut sortierten Biomarkt. Die Erzeugnisse des Klosters sind wirklich von bester Qualität?
Susi Bauer (3 years ago)
Ein sehr guter Ort, um Ruhe zu finden. Sehr freundliches Personal und die Buchung war auch sehr einfach. Kann ich auf jeden Fall weiterempfehlen.
YAYNABEBA ABAYNEH (3 years ago)
It is very nice
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