Albrecht Dürer's House

Nuremberg, Germany

Albrecht Dürer's House was the home of German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer from 1509 to his death in 1528. The House lies in the extreme north-west of Nuremberg's Altstadt, near the Kaiserburg section of the Nuremberg Castle and the Tiergärtnertor of Nuremberg's city walls.

The house was built around 1420. It has five stories; the bottom two have sandstone walls, while the upper stories are timber framed; the entire structure is topped by a half-hip roof. In 1501, it was purchased by Bernhard Walther, a merchant and prominent astronomer. Walter remodeled the house, adding small windows to the roof so that it could function as an observatory. Walther died in 1504, and Dürer purchased the house in 1509.

Since 1871 the Albrecht-Dürer-Haus has been a museum dedicated to Dürer's life and work. In a restoration of 1909, the large dormer on the east-facing roof was replaced. In October 1944, it took significant damage from Allied bombing. It was rebuilt by 1949, but did not reopen as a museum until 1971, Dürer's 500th birthday.

The museum features installations of period furnishings, a re-creation of Dürer's workshop in which visitors can view demonstrations of printmaking techniques, and rotating exhibitions of drawings and prints by Dürer from the City of Nuremberg's Graphic Collection. Visitors can also receive a guided tour of the house from an actress playing Agnes Dürer, the wife of the artist.

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Details

Founded: 1420
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M K Markey (10 months ago)
Worth a visit, is this a N must see? Probably, especially for the history buffs in the crowd, for the others, find a rendezvous spot and refresh yourself with a Frankish beer - Frankish please.
Jeff Davies (11 months ago)
Fascinating history of the artist and his home. I wish there were more period furnishings, but then it would be more crowded and probably cost more. They provide recorded headsets, but you can see the whole house in half an hour if you skip a few recordings.
Patrícia Penna (11 months ago)
That was very a pleasant surprise in the city! The museum is a bit of a time travel, and I loved to find out more about the life and art of Dürer. The house is very charming and gives you an idea of how it was to live there in the past.
Lynne Ross (12 months ago)
It doesn't take very long to visit. Very near other sites worth viewing, including the plaza and pubs outside. Every bit as nice as Rembrandt's house in Amsterdam, only not as big.
Jeremy Boulat (12 months ago)
A lovely little museum with many original paintings as well as skilled copies. On the top floor you'll be even be able to see an artist create etching on copper plates.
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