Albrecht Dürer's House

Nuremberg, Germany

Albrecht Dürer's House was the home of German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer from 1509 to his death in 1528. The House lies in the extreme north-west of Nuremberg's Altstadt, near the Kaiserburg section of the Nuremberg Castle and the Tiergärtnertor of Nuremberg's city walls.

The house was built around 1420. It has five stories; the bottom two have sandstone walls, while the upper stories are timber framed; the entire structure is topped by a half-hip roof. In 1501, it was purchased by Bernhard Walther, a merchant and prominent astronomer. Walter remodeled the house, adding small windows to the roof so that it could function as an observatory. Walther died in 1504, and Dürer purchased the house in 1509.

Since 1871 the Albrecht-Dürer-Haus has been a museum dedicated to Dürer's life and work. In a restoration of 1909, the large dormer on the east-facing roof was replaced. In October 1944, it took significant damage from Allied bombing. It was rebuilt by 1949, but did not reopen as a museum until 1971, Dürer's 500th birthday.

The museum features installations of period furnishings, a re-creation of Dürer's workshop in which visitors can view demonstrations of printmaking techniques, and rotating exhibitions of drawings and prints by Dürer from the City of Nuremberg's Graphic Collection. Visitors can also receive a guided tour of the house from an actress playing Agnes Dürer, the wife of the artist.

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Details

Founded: 1420
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Ciprian (5 months ago)
The place where the famous painter and engraver used to live.Very nice rehabilitated.Unfortunately,there's only one room in the house that we know for sure what it was in that times:the kitchen.All the other rooms are arranged based on assumptions:"here probably was the workshop,there probably was the bedroom" and so on.Yet the house is very interesting helping you to make an idea about how people of that times lived.No original paintings of the artist(you can see some in Germanisches National museum)
F.R. Dini Ginting (10 months ago)
Well maintained, clean, also friendly and helpful staff. Make sure to visit the small art gallery just next to the stairs towards exit, it's easy to be overseen
F.R. Dini Ginting (10 months ago)
Well maintained, clean, also friendly and helpful staff. Make sure to visit the small art gallery just next to the stairs towards exit, it's easy to be overseen
Andrea Di Tommaso (12 months ago)
Explains really good the life and evolution of the great German artist Albrecht Dürer
Andrea Di Tommaso (12 months ago)
Explains really good the life and evolution of the great German artist Albrecht Dürer
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