Tittmoning Castle

Tittmoning, Germany

The settlement of Titamanninga was first mentioned about 790 AD, then a possession of St Peter's Abbey, Salzburg. After the Archbishops of Salzbug had achieved immediate status in the late 13th century, Tittmoning Castle was built as a border fortress against the incursions by the Dukes of Bavaria. The episcopal administrator of the castle and its environs was called burgrave, as was Ulrich von Wispeck in 1282. Tittmoning was occupied by the forces of the German king Louis the Bavarian during his conflict with the papacy in 1324; nevertheless, he restored it to the Salzburg archbishops three years later.

Temporarily given in pawn to Bavaria, the unlucky Prince-Archbishop Wolf Dietrich Raitenau had to cede the castle to the Bavarian duke Maximilian I in 1611; it was repurchased by his successor Archbishop Mark Sittich von Hohenems and rebuilt as a hunting lodge according to plans designed by Santino Solari. By the 17th century the castle had finally lost its character of a fortress and became the summer residence of the Prince-Archbishops. Upon the Congress of Vienna, the Rupertiwinkel region finally fell to the Kingdom of Bavaria and Tittimoning Castle, damaged by French troops during the Napoleonic Wars, passed under state-ownership.

In the early years of World War II the castle was used as a prisoner-of-war camp for officers, Oflag VII-D. British and American citizens were also interned there. Today Tittmoning castle is a museum.

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Address

Burg 6, Tittmoning, Germany
See all sites in Tittmoning

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Susanne L. (8 months ago)
Such a beautiful castle with a great location! Had a sunny day in Tittmorning today. Unfortunately, the castle is currently not open to the public, just like the chapel belonging to it, and the footpath from the old town to the castle is also closed due to construction work. All in all, the view is wonderful and a worthwhile visit in sunny weather
Mae Martin (2 years ago)
Fabulous views and refreshing walk.
aasim ahmed (2 years ago)
Exotic
Miroslav Lajoš-Geci (2 years ago)
Relax.
Peter Neufeld (2 years ago)
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