The tower-fortress was built in the second half of the 14th century of local limestone. Tower-strongholds were built by vassals to protect roads and waterways and to protect themselves against peasant uprisings. Construction of such tower-strongholds increased after the failed St. George's Night uprising by peasants in 1343.

In 1986, the fortress was restored under the leadership of Vao sovkhoz. Exhibition on the I floor introduces the history of Vao Tower-Fortress and Manor, and the surrounding villages. The II floor is a medieval dwelling that includes the washing area (place for washing hands), and dansker (dry toilet). The current furnishing imitates the pristine appearance of the room. The windows are of beautiful stained glass. The staircase in the wall leading to the cellar adds mysticism to the place. The III floor is enlivened by paintings created by the artist E.Veermäe which depict people in medieval clothing.

Reference: Visit Estonia, 7is7.com

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