Hradisko Monastery

Olomouc, Czech Republic

Hradisko Monastery was originally a Benedictine monastery, from the mid-12th century a premonstratensian monastery in Olomouc. It was established in 1078 and it serves as an military hospital since 1802.

The four-winged building with a rectangular platform, with corner towers and a moat, is divided by an inner lateral wing into two parts - the convent and the prelature. While the northern part of the monastery was built in the spirit of Italian Mannerism, the prelature building is High Baroque. The monumental front face of the prelature is adorned with sculptured architectural decoration and a portal with columns and a balcony. On the upper floor of the Prelature, there is a ceremonial hall. The leading Austrian painter Paul Troger contributed, along with others, to the inner decoration. Troger painted the monumental ceiling fresco on the theme of Christ’s Feeding of the 5000 in the year 1731. The fresco is surrounded by a painting of illusive architecture by Antonio Tassi. Equally significant is the painting and stucco decoration of the library’s vaults. The Italian painter Innocenzo Monti and the sculptor Baltassare Fontana worked together on it at the beginning of the 18th century.

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Details

Founded: 1078
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

youri lekhtsier (3 years ago)
Military hospital, where you can have your vacine
Andrey Rakhubovsky (3 years ago)
The building is amazing from the inside. The people are nice.
Martin Drobný (3 years ago)
Beautiful historical site Currently as military hospital with no public entrance unfortunately
Petr Maucy (5 years ago)
Great place, nice people, good food and beer.
Miroslav Metlík (6 years ago)
Ok
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