Trebic Jewish Quarter

Třebíč, Czech Republic

The Jewish Quarter of Třebíč placed is one of the best preserved Jewish ghettos in Europe. Therefore, it was listed in 2003 (together with the Jewish Cemetery and the St. Procopius Basilica) in the UNESCO World Heritage List and it is the only Jewish monument outside Israel specifically placed on the List.

The Jewish Quarter is situated on the north bank of the River Jihlava, surrounded by rocks and the river. There are 123 houses, two synagogues and a Jewish cemetery which isn't in the area of the town.

All original Jewish inhabitants (in 1890 there lived nearly 1,500 Jews, but in the 1930s only 300 of them were of Jewish faith) were deported and murdered in concentration camps by Nazis during the World War II. Only ten of them came back after the war. Therefore, many buildings of the Jewish town (e. g. the town hall, rabbi's office, hospital, poorhouse or school) do not serve their original purpose any more and the houses are now owned by people of non-Jewish faith.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Zingor (2 years ago)
Krásný rozlehlý židovský hřbitov. Starší náhrobky až vzadu. Bohužel, ta velikost a novověké užívání způsobily, že tak trochu ztrácí kouzlo těch malých starých židovských hřbitovů.
Maciej Borski (2 years ago)
Piękny, duży i zadbany cmentarz żydowski. Pięknie położony na wzgórzu. Jest tu pochowanych wielu miejscowych Żydów. Niektóre nekropolie to prawdziwe dzieła sztuki. Najstarsze nagrobki pochodzą z 17 wieku. Cześć pochowanych zginęła w oswiecimskim holokauscie.
Cameron Lindsay (3 years ago)
A sad, and atmospheric place that is also sadly neglected.
Anna Aglietti (3 years ago)
A secluded spot for the lovers of gothic atmosphere. Try to go there with a crepuscular fog and some wolf howling in the distance. (Otherwise, a lovely sunny day will do if you mumble melancholy poems to yourself). Notice how the ivy has eaten up half of the tombstones and start wondering what's wrong with the other half... ok, maybe just consider the interesting carvings on the tombstones and relax under the beautiful trees. (mind that zombie hand reaching for your foot!)
Daniel Sies (4 years ago)
Really worth a visit after visiting the Jewish ghetto.
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