St. Peter's Church

Tartu, Estonia

St.Peter's congregation of Tartu was established on 27 October 1869 and the St. Peter's Church was consecrated in 1884. This pseudogothic imposing building was built pursuant to a design by E. Schröder. The location was symbolic of the time of the Estonian awakening: in the proximity of the square where the first general Estonian song festival took place. The church was finally completed in 1903, when the freshly finished 55- metre chief tower and four corner towers were consecrated. A 22- register organ and the altar painting, "Dying Christ" (by J. Köler), were finished in the 1890's. Both church bells have been cast in Gatsina near St. Petersburg.

Reference: Visit Tartu

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1884
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Argo Vahter (3 years ago)
Dr. Arkadiy Bessantin (5 years ago)
Хорошо отреставрировали
Anatoly Ko (9 years ago)
Narva maantee 104, Annelinn, Tartu, 58.387172, 26.727312 ‎58° 23' 13.82", 26° 43' 38.32" Тартуский приход св. Петра ведет свое начало с 1869 года, когда был подписан т.н. разделительный договор между тартуским Мариинским приходом и магистратом. Собор освятили в сентябре 1884 года. Петровская церковь, спроектированная архитектором Э. Шредером, стоит на символическом для самосознания эстонского народа месте – именно здесь в 1869 г. проходил Первый всеэстонский Праздник песни. В 1948-1997 годы церковь св. Петра служила пристанищем для Мариинского прихода, а с начала 90-х – также и для тартуского ингерманландского прихода.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Falaise

Château de Falaise is best known as a castle, where William the Conqueror, the son of Duke Robert of Normandy, was born in about 1028. William went on to conquer England and become king and possession of the castle descended through his heirs until the 13th century when it was captured by King Philip II of France. Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840 it has been protected as a monument historique.

The castle (12th–13th century), which overlooks the town from a high crag, was formerly the seat of the Dukes of Normandy. The construction was started on the site of an earlier castle in 1123 by Henry I of England, with the 'large keep' (grand donjon). Later was added the 'small keep' (petit donjon). The tower built in the first quarter of the 12th century contained a hall, chapel, and a room for the lord, but no small rooms for a complicated household arrangement; in this way, it was similar to towers at Corfe, Norwich, and Portchester, all in England. In 1202 Arthur I, Duke of Brittany was King John of England's nephew, was imprisoned in Falaise castle's keep. According to contemporaneous chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall, John ordered two of his servants to mutilate the duke. Hugh de Burgh was in charge of guarding Arthur and refused to let him be mutilated, but to demoralise Arthur's supporters was to announce his death. The circumstances of Arthur's death are unclear, though he probably died in 1203.

In about 1207, after having conquered Normandy, Philip II Augustus ordered the building of a new cylindrical keep. It was later named the Talbot Tower (Tour Talbot) after the English commander responsible for its repair during the Hundred Years' War. It is a tall round tower, similar design to the towers built at Gisors and the medieval Louvre.Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840, Château de Falaise has been recognised as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

A programme of restoration was carried out between 1870 and 1874. The castle suffered due to bombardment during the Second World War in the battle for the Falaise pocket in 1944, but the three keeps were unscathed.