Kambja Church

Kambja, Estonia

The first wooden church of Kambja was built probably in the beginning of the 14th century. Churches were destroyed and rebuilt several times during centuries. The present Lutheran St. Martin’s Church was originally rebuilt in 1720, this time of stone and a transept was added to the old part in 1874. After World War II, the church, which is one of the biggest in Southern Estonia, was in ruins for many years until restoration began in 1989. The old bells which were cast in Moscow have survived. A new organ was donated by the Träsiövi congregation of Sweden.

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Address

Kesk 6, Kambja, Estonia
See all sites in Kambja

Details

Founded: 1720
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Urve Salundi (3 years ago)
Tagasihoidlikult ilus kirik.Hea kontserdipaik.Jahedavõitu, kuid vastuvõtt soe ja sõbralik.Alati ollakse nõus esinejaid vastuvõtma.
Heigo Ensling (3 years ago)
A large and powerful church with a golden rooster in the tower
Rain Auto (3 years ago)
Beautiful, place picturesque.
Signe Kumar (3 years ago)
Beautiful, big and powerful.
Toomas Sööt (3 years ago)
????
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