Angel's Bridge

Tartu, Estonia

The Angel’s Bridge, located on Toome hill, was built in the 19th century and spans Lossi Street. The writing on the bridge, “otium reficit vires“ (rest restores strength), invites one to use Toome hill as a place of rejuvenation.

The bridge, designed by J.W. Krause, was built in 1814-1816 and replaced an earlier temporary bridge. The bridge was thoroughly renovated in 1913, at which time a bust-portrait of the university’s first rector, G. Fr. Parrot, and a dedication text, was placed on the bridge’s Toome Hill face (sculptor C. v. Wetter-Rosenthal). Toome Hill´s larger bridge is the yellow and white, classical style.

The name is thought to come from a linguistic twist - part of the hill is landscaped like an English garden and the words "English" (inglise) and Angel (ingel) are nearly the same in Estonian. Local tradition says that when crossing it, you should hold your breath and make a wish!

Reference: Tartu Tourism Information

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Address

Lossi, Tartu, Estonia
See all sites in Tartu

Details

Founded: 1814-1816
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Stankevich (2 years ago)
Iconic place :)
George On tour (2 years ago)
When you walk to Toomemägi (Dome Hill) in Tartu, you will certainly notice the Inglisild, which was built in 1838 according to the design of architect JW Krause. There is a bar relief of the first rector of the University of Tartu GF Parrot with the writing “Otium reficit vires” on the bridge. Interesting facts: - the name of the bridge probably comes from the name "English bridge" as the part was established in the English style.
Zala Vrbek (2 years ago)
It’s said that if you cross it for the first time you should think of a wish and hold your breath until you come to the other side so that your wish will come true. I say it’s worth a try
Thaal (3 years ago)
A bridge you need to walk over if you're visiting Tartu.
kaarel kullamaa (3 years ago)
Second legendary bridge in Estonia, called angel bridge
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