Viru-Nigula Chapel Ruins

Viru-Nigula, Estonia

The ruins of the Viru-Nigula Maarja chapel, which was shaped like a Greek cross, is the only building of this kind from the Catholic period in Estonia. The ruins have also been associated with a Russian style church architecture The chapel probably dates back to the 13th century.

Reference: Jaanus Plaat. Orthodoxy and Orthodox Sacral Buildings in Estonia from the 11th to the 19th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.folklore.ee

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

lero2891 (13 months ago)
The old church with ancient burials, next to the church estate, where there is a museum with the history of the life of the pastor and his family, the museum has a great guide))
Leonid Romanov (13 months ago)
The old church with ancient burials, next to the church estate, where there is a museum with the history of the life of the pastor and his family, the museum has a great guide))
Matteo Laurenzi (16 months ago)
A very pretty church now Lutheran.
Matteo Laurenzi (16 months ago)
A very pretty church now Lutheran.
Tarmo Tarbe (17 months ago)
Just old church
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