Hořovice Castle was built in two parts. In the first half of the 19th century by Friedrich Wilhelm I of Hesse, following plans of the architect G. Engelhardt, a major rebuilding took place, adding another story to the building.

Its final appearance is due to more refurbishings at the beginning of the 20th century, with the furniture of the rooms being carried out in late classicist style.

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Founded: 19th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Christoph Drenk (2 years ago)
If you are around, drop in. The big adjacent condos really kill the 'castle' atmosphere
Marzio Volpi (2 years ago)
Nice park to walk
QuiXperia Zen (2 years ago)
Beautiful and relaxing chateau gardens :)
Ishola Olajide (3 years ago)
The history about this #Chateau is intriguing and is quite interesting how it stands till date despite the countless transfer of ownership. You have to admire the collection and listen to the story about each room at the same time, once the tour guide is done talking, you have move to the next room with the door locked behind you.
Olajide Ishola (3 years ago)
The history about this #Chateau is intriguing and is quite interesting how it stands till date despite the countless transfer of ownership. You have to admire the collection and listen to the story about each room at the same time, once the tour guide is done talking, you have move to the next room with the door locked behind you.
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