Sammatti Church

Lohja, Finland

The Sammatti Church is one of the oldest wooden churches still in year round use in Finland. It was constructed by Mickel Jöransson in 1754-55. This is the third church for the Sammatti congregation. First information on Sammatti as a locality dates back to 1406. As a chapel of the Lohja parish, Sammatti has existed since the end of the 16th century. It became its own parish in 1951.

Even though the current church looks small, it can house up to 350 people.The history of Sammatti Church is closely related to the Finnish national awakening in the 19th century and the life of Elias Lönnrot. During his retirement, Lönnrot organised the services in the church for over ten years, delivering the sermon regularly. Lönnrot also took part in the renewing of the Finnish hymn book in Sammatti. The altarpiece, painted by Adolf von Becker, was donated by Lönnrot.

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Address

Lönnrotintie 19, Lohja, Finland
See all sites in Lohja

Details

Founded: 1754-1755
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.visitlohja.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allu Saarinen (4 months ago)
Mersu
Irmeli Wikman (4 months ago)
En söt romantisk trä kyrka. Värt ett besök.
Vesa Sakki (5 months ago)
Hieno pikku kirkko ja hautausmaa. Tyylikäs.
Olavi Kivelä (5 months ago)
Hautajaisvieraana.Kaunis tilaisuus.
Schleichtalli viivi (2 years ago)
Elias Lönnrotin kotikirkko, joka tiekirkkonakin palvelee. Erittäin kaunis ja tunnelmallinen pieni kirkko.
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