Top Historic Sights in Ljubljana, Slovenia

Explore the historic highlights of Ljubljana

Triple Bridge

The Triple Bridge is a group of three bridges across the Ljubljanica River. It connects the Ljubljana"s historical, medieval, town on one bank, and the modern city of Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia, on the other. The central bridge is partly built from Glinica limestone. Other parts are built from concrete. The balustrades with 642 balusters are made of artificial concrete. The platform is covered with granite block ...
Founded: 1842 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Franciscan Church of the Annunciation

The Franciscan Church of the Annunciation is located on Prešeren Square in Ljubljana. Built between 1646 and 1660 (the bell towers following later), it replaced an older church on the same site. The early-Baroque layout takes the form of a basilica with one nave and two rows of side-chapels. The Baroque main altar was executed by the sculptor Francesco Robba. Many of the original frescoes were ruined by the cracks ...
Founded: 1646-1660 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ljubljana Cathedral

Ljubljana Cathedral, also named St. Nicholas" Cathedral, was originally a Gothic church. In the early 18th century, it was replaced by a Baroque building. It is an easily recognizable landmark of the city with its green dome and twin towers and stands at Cyril and Methodius Square by the nearby Ljubljana Central Market and Town Hall. The site was originally occupied by an aisled three-nave Romanesque church, the old ...
Founded: 1701-1707 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ljubljana Castle

Ljubljana Castle stands above the downtown of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. Originally a Medieval fortress, probably built in the 11th century and rebuilt in the 12th century, it acquired its present outline with an almost complete overhaul in the 15th century, whereas the majority of the buildings date to the 16th and 17th centuries. At first a defense structure and since the first half of the 14th century the seat ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

St. James' Church

St. James's Parish Church was built in the Baroque style between 1613 and 1615 on the site of an older Gothic style church, erected in the early 15th century by the Augustinian Order. In 1598, the old church was acquired by the Jesuits and thus became the first Jesuit church in the Slovene Lands and one of the first in the Inner Austria. The interior was designed by the Italian architect Francesco Robba, who designed the ...
Founded: 1613-1615 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ursuline Church of the Holy Trinity

Ursuline Church of the Holy Trinity was built between 1718 and 1726 in the Baroque style. The church was designed by Carlo Martinuzzi, a Friulian architect, and is noted for its extensive altar made of African marble designed by Francesco Robba, who also built the Fountain of the Three Rivers of Carniola which stands on Town Square in Ljubljana. The original bell tower was destroyed in the Ljubljana earthquake of 1895. Th ...
Founded: 1718-1726 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

St. Florian's Church

The Church of St. Florian was commissioned by the citizens of Ljubljana in memory of the great fire which devastated the Stari trg and Gornji trg squares in 1660. Built after 1672, the church burnt down in 1774. Since then it has undergone several reconstructions. It was given its present appearance by the architect Jože Plečnik, who reconstructed it between 1933 and 1934. Plečnik had the former door recess fi ...
Founded: 1672-1696 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

National Museum of Slovenia

The National Museum of Slovenia has an extensive collection of archaeological artefacts, old coins and banknotes and displays related to the applied arts. The museum was founded in 1821. After the establishment of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the name was changed to National Museum. In 1923 the ethnographic collections possessed by the museum were removed and placed in the new Slovene Ethnographic Museum an ...
Founded: 1821 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

National Gallery of Slovenia

The National Gallery of Slovenia was founded in 1918, after the dissolution of Austria-Hungary and the establishment of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. Initially, it was hosted in the Kresija Palace of Ljubljana, but moved to the present location in 1925. The gallery hosts a permanent art collection from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. The original of the Baroque Robba fountain can also be seen in the ...
Founded: 1918 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Early Christian Centre

The Early Christian Centre occupied one of the Roman Emona"s building plots, which usually measured from 3,000 to 3,600 square metres and were demarcated by four roads. The Centre was located in the vicinity of the Forum and the western town wall, the remains of which have been preserved in the Erjavčeva cesta road across the way from the Cankarjev dom cultural and congress centre. Like most of the buildings in ...
Founded: 4th century AD | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia

Cekin Mansion on the northern edge of Tivoli Park houses the Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia. The mansion is named after Laurenz Szőgyény, the husband of Ivana Lamberg, who was given the building. The name Szőgyény was Slovenized by the townspeople into Cekin. The mansion was commissioned in 1720 by Leopold Lamberg based on plans by the Viennese Baroque architect Fischer von Erlach. Dur ...
Founded: 1720 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Tivoli Castle

Tivoli Castle is a mansion located in the Ljubljana's Tivoli Park. In the early 15th century, a tower stood in the woods above the site; it was owned by Georg Apfalterer, an ally of Duke Frederick (later Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III). The tower was destroyed by Frederick II, Count of Celje in 1440. The current structure was built in the 17th century atop the ruins of a previous Renaissance-period castle, the mansion ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Roman Town Walls

According to an inscription found next to the eastern town gate of Emona, on the site of the present Trg francoske revolucije square, the Roman town walls were built between 14 and 15 AD. The rectangular-shaped walls surrounding the town centre measured 2.4 metres wide and from 6 to 8 metres high. They included at least 26 towers and four main gates. The towers were erected at equal distances along the length of the walls ...
Founded: 14-15 AD | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Emona Archaeological park

The Jakopič Garden, named after the famous Slovenian Impressionist painter Rihard Jakopič, whose studio overlooked the garden, is the site of the remains of a terraced Roman house built in the 1st century AD as part of a larger building complex. In the times of the Roman Emona, the building, now referred to as House No. 15a, used to contain four apartments with a large shared atrium. The remains of the house, w ...
Founded: 0-100 AD | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

St. Peter's Church

St. Peter's Parish Church is one of the oldest churches in Ljubljana. The original church at the site was presumably built near the city walls already at the turn of the 9th century on the order of Paulinus II, the Patriarch of Aquilea. It was the seat of the Primitive Parish of Ljubljana. The church was encircled by a cemetery that was the main town cemetery until 1779, when it was abandoned. The current building was er ...
Founded: 1730-1733 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

St. Bartholomew's Church

St. Bartholomew's Church is one of the oldest church buildings in Ljubljana. The church was first mentioned in 1370, when in front of it a peace treaty between the Doge of Venice and Leopold III and Albert III of Habsburg was concluded by their representatives on 30 October 1370, in which the Austrians agreed to return the city of Trieste for the compensation of 75,000 florins. In 1526, its valuables were donated to a fu ...
Founded: 1370 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Fuzine Castle

Fužine Castle is Ljubljana's has retained its original Renaissance character. It was built by a crossing point over the Ljubljanica river's rapids between 1528 and 1557 on commission from the wealthy local merchants Veit Khisl and Hans Weilhaimer, the former of whom served several terms of office as Mayor of Ljubljana. A defence tower was built in each of the four corners of the castle building and another one over the e ...
Founded: 1528-1557 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Visitation of Mary Church

Visitation of Mary Church was already recorded on Rožnik Hill in a 1526 document, stating that it had to provide a copper chalice and three pounds of hellers for the war effort. This church was razed in 1740, and a new church was built in 1746 according to plans by Candido Zulliani (1712–1769) and consecrated by Bishop Ernest Attems (1742–1757) in 1747. The church was damaged by artillery fire during the Nap ...
Founded: 1746 | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.