Sevnica Castle it dominates the old town of Sevnica and offers views of the surrounding countryside.

The Archdiocese of Salzburg held local estates since 1043 and Sevnica Castle was mentioned for the first time in 1309. The origin of the building was not documented but it was most probably built during the bishopric of Konrad the First von Abensberg (1106–1147), who rebuilt and colonized this area devastated by Hungarian invasions in the 10th century and in the beginning of the 12th century. The only remaining part of the original building is a tower nowadays included in the left wing of the castle.

The so-called Lutheran Cellar was built in the mid-16th century at the southeast side of the Castle Hill. The interior of it embellish frescos dates from the second half of the 16th century.

Between 1595 and 1597, Innocenz Moscon rebuilt the castle in then contemporary Late-Renaissance style and gave it thus its present form. The castle remained the ownership of the Archdiocese of Salzburg until 1803. The storms and fire damaged the castle in 1778 and 1801.

In 1803 Count Johann Händl von Rebenburg became the proprietor of Sevnica Castle. He lowered the battlements, filled in the moats, planted the trees in the park around the castle and made a vineyard with terraces at the south side of the castle hill.

As many other castles in Slovenia, Sevnica Castle was nationalized after the World War II and the precious furniture, which remained untouched until then, vanished. Poor families without apartments of their own were accommodated in the castle and they contributed to the ruination of its property. The park was in a state of total neglect and nobody cared about the vineyard anymore, so even the wine cellar beside Lutheran Cellar was not needed and was removed. The castle has been restored since the 1960s.

Today, Sevnica Castle houses the School and Firefighting Museum, the Museum of Exiles, and an exhibition of decorative arts.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovenia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto Rodriguez (2 years ago)
Great people and beautiful views
Janez Lipec (3 years ago)
Sevnica is Melanie Tramp birth town with good positive energy and nice people. Event with Rotary Club Sevnica in Castle Sevnica is very nice. You must came.
Jera Jeruc (3 years ago)
Nice castle with breathtaking views over the valley. Only the courtyard was accessible when we were visiting, but it seems that there is nothing extremely interesting to visit inside. There is a café and small shops at the entrance, but working very limited hours. Sher surrounding park with vineyard is well kept and worth visiting.
Richard Potter (3 years ago)
Beautiful place incredible views. Only space for four campers.
Kristian Božičnik (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle
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