It is believed that the Lužnica manor was built at the beginning of the 18th century. Since 1791 the estate was the owned by Rauch noble family. They soon had the manor renovated and further expanded. At the end of 19th century, Marija Jurić Zagorka, lived in the manor from the age of 3 until 10 years, as her father was estate manager for the Rauch family. She later became one of the most prominent Croatian writers of a time. Countess Antonija noticed the talent of young Zagorka, so she made possible for her to use the castle library and attend private schooling lessons along her own kids. In 1923, Geza, the final member of Rauch family was killed under suspicious circumstances. Following his death, his widow Antonija, sold Lužnica, which then became property of Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul.

At a time, this order was looking for a large estate close to capital, Zagreb, for sixty of its members. One part of the manor was soon turned into a hospital, another part into a chapel, while surrounding land was used for agriculture. The goods from the estate were shipped to a Sisters of Charity Hospital in Zagreb. At the beginning of the 20th century, the manor was also used as a kindergarten, music and householdng school for the local community.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: c. 1791
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonela Wendling (11 months ago)
Not pet friendly really -don't know why-they didn't let us in the park, and when I asked why-answer was very confused about their "politic" ''?!! Pitty
Shka Rich (12 months ago)
Lovely piece oh history
Marko Dilberovic (15 months ago)
On our tour of Zapresic's castles, this one was a must. We didn't go inside the castle but spent an hour around it. The park behind is great, well decorated and really looking nice. The birds in the lake are also u plus. The day was a bit rainy so we saw an amazing rainbow right above the castle at some point. You can park in front of the castle but be aware of the working hours so you don't miss out on anything.
Jana Havranek (20 months ago)
If into old and well kept properties one of the places to put on your list.
Dorotea Pecaric (2 years ago)
An old baroque castle made beautiful again by the Sisters of Mercy. The visit of the place is not complete without a walk in the park, around the lake. Period landscaping on a large scale. You'll be glad you took the effort to visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.