Luznica Manor

Lužnica, Croatia

It is believed that the Lužnica manor was built at the beginning of the 18th century. Since 1791 the estate was the owned by Rauch noble family. They soon had the manor renovated and further expanded. At the end of 19th century, Marija Jurić Zagorka, lived in the manor from the age of 3 until 10 years, as her father was estate manager for the Rauch family. She later became one of the most prominent Croatian writers of a time. Countess Antonija noticed the talent of young Zagorka, so she made possible for her to use the castle library and attend private schooling lessons along her own kids. In 1923, Geza, the final member of Rauch family was killed under suspicious circumstances. Following his death, his widow Antonija, sold Lužnica, which then became property of Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul.

At a time, this order was looking for a large estate close to capital, Zagreb, for sixty of its members. One part of the manor was soon turned into a hospital, another part into a chapel, while surrounding land was used for agriculture. The goods from the estate were shipped to a Sisters of Charity Hospital in Zagreb. At the beginning of the 20th century, the manor was also used as a kindergarten, music and householdng school for the local community.

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Details

Founded: c. 1791
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Billy (9 months ago)
Ok
Martina Janković (9 months ago)
Super
Stjepan Matoic Dijanić (15 months ago)
Peaceful place thats great for a walk on a weekend
Chris (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful area. At the time of our visit, it was 10 HRK to enter the garden.
Ezgi Koçdağ (2 years ago)
Looks nice from outside, today is Saturday it says it's open but i wasn't.
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