Lier Town Hall

Lier, Belgium

The present Lier Town Hall is the former clothmakers’ hall. In 1740 architect Jan Pieter de Bauerscheit the Younger substantially renovated the building, converting it into Brabant rococo style. It was designed as a large mansion adjacent to the Gothic Belfry. The council chamber is in Louis XV style. Special features worthy of note are the elegant oak spiral staircase, the painted ceiling in the council chamber, the wrought-iron work of art 'Fighting the Dragon' by Louis van Boeckel and a large collection of paintings and antiques.

In 1369 Hendrik Mijs built a Gothic belfry next to the clothmakers' hall. It stands as a symbol of freedom and independance. In the Middle Ages the town’s deeds and freedoms were kept in the belfries, as was the arsenal, and the town council’s assembly room was also to be found there.

Since 1971 the tower has housed a small automatic carillon with 23 bells. Together with 23 other belfries the Lier belfry was recognised by UNESCO as a World Cultural Heritage Site in 1999.

References:
  • Visit Lier

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Address

Grote Markt 58, Lier, Belgium
See all sites in Lier

Details

Founded: 1369/1740
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

www.visitlier.be

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bill ES. (6 months ago)
Lovely place
patrick van hoof (2 years ago)
Top
Karen O. (3 years ago)
It’s beautiful historical architecture can be seen even at the Grote Markt, a central square in the old town which houses the city hall and the infamous Silvius Brabo, a mythical Roman soldier who killed a giant, called Druon Antigoon, who asked money from people that wanted to pass the bridge over the river Scheldt. When people didn't want to or couldn't pay, the giant cut off their hand and threw it in the river. Because of this, Brabo also removed the hand of the giant, and threw it into the river.
Jakub Studniarek (3 years ago)
Nice place
yves frombelgium (4 years ago)
Historic center of the city of Lier, nicely restored and maintained
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