Maredsous Abbey

Denée, Belgium

Maredsous Abbey was founded in 1872 by Beuron Abbey in Germany. The foundation was supported financially by the Desclée family, who paid for the design and construction of the spectacular buildings, which are the masterwork of the architect Jean-Baptiste de Béthune (1831–1894), leader of the neo-gothic style in Belgium. The overall plan is based on the 13th century Cistercian abbey of Villers at Villers-la-Ville in Walloon Brabant. The frescos however were undertaken by the art school of the mother-house at Beuron, much against the will of Béthune and Desclée, who dismissed the Beuron style as 'Assyrian-Bavarian'. Construction was finished in 1892.

Maredsous Abbey is also known for the production of Maredsous cheese. It is a loaf-shaped cheese made from cow's milk. The cheese is lightly pressed, then washed in brine to create the firm, orange crust and pungent aroma. The abbey also licenses its name to Brouwerij Duvel Moortgat, since 1963 the makers of Maredsous beer.

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Founded: 1872
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lore Leighton (2 years ago)
Beautiful grounds and lots of good food and beer options. You can freely visit the church but to see the main Abbey you must join a tour.
Записки Любимой (2 years ago)
Very nice place to visit! Tasty cheese and bread mmmmm☺
alevped 83 (2 years ago)
Loved it! They have the Maredsous Extra beer, which you can only get at the Abbey, super tasty! Good lunch, big portions and good price, and they make their own bread which was delicious
Frank De Valckenaere (3 years ago)
Very beautiful just to bad it turned in to a business and you can not find the real spirit of the monastery anymore. Prices are not cheaper then in local stores so why rush and but there. Just try to enjoy the history and forget the business...
Chazie Antunes (3 years ago)
I stayed 4 days in the Abbey, and it was the most precious time of my life! Time to find myself, to stay away from the consumer/outside world. Just some time to meditate, pray, walk, draw etc... It is a place of great power and peace.
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