Belfry of Namur

Namur, Belgium

The belfry of Namur, also called Saint-Jacob's Tower was constructed in 1388 as part of the city wall. It was remodeled as a belfry in 1746. It is one of the 56 belfries of Belgium and France classified as the World Heritage Site of the UNESCO.

In the beginning, one of the clocks of the Saint-Pierre-au-Château church served as belfry for the citizens of Namur, which is to indicate the time and to announce events in the city. After the destruction of the church, burned down during the siege of Namur in 1745, the Tour Saint-Jacques, the oldest of the three towers of the medieval city walls, became the city belfry. The Tour Saint-Jacques protected one of the city gates. Its bancloque (belfry clock) gave the signal for the opening and closure of the external city gates (from 1570 on).

At the beginning of the 18th century, the city wall was demolished but the Tour Saint-Jacques was preserved, restored and its clock was covered by an octagonal structure. This entire part was lifted upon a clock bulb. The Tour Saint-Jacques became Namur's city belfry in 1746.

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Founded: 1388
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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marek Sopko (6 months ago)
I apologize, but this is just one of the thousands similar buildings... you cannot go in, so just walk around, take one picture and go...
ncku16howard (18 months ago)
Everything is fine but the WC ~! Why must be there ?
Robin Irwin (2 years ago)
The Sint Jacob's tower is built in the 14th century as part of the city wall. Unfortunately during the 18th century, a fire burnt down the church that was connected to it. After the fire, it became the belfry tower of Namur
Mārtiņš Mieriņš (3 years ago)
Nice spot in the Town
David Rawson (3 years ago)
Great views and good attraction
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