Carcassonne Cathedral

Carcassonne, France

Carcassonne Cathedral was built in the 13th century as a parish church, dedicated to Saint Michael. Following war damage in the 14th century it was rebuilt as a fortified church. In 1803 St. Michael's was elevated to cathedral status, replacing the earlier cathedral dedicated to Saints Nazarius and Celsus, now the Basilica of St. Nazaire and St. Celse.

The cathedral plan is characterised by its relative simplicity. It forms a single nave with a 20 metre high vault, lined with several lateral chapels. The chior screen has retained its 14th century stained glass. The sober façade has a single decorative feature in the form of a large rosette 8 meters in diameter, and the adjoining bell tower is relatively massive.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felix Anaya (3 months ago)
Close to the train station but check the schedule as it is not always open.
Babett Günther (4 months ago)
Nice :)
Roger Hall (5 months ago)
Nice Town and Nice cars...
Mechanical Engineer (6 months ago)
That was good town
P. B. (10 months ago)
Absolutely amazing place - there is nothing more we could add. We had a lovely family day.
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