Carcassonne Cathedral

Carcassonne, France

Carcassonne Cathedral was built in the 13th century as a parish church, dedicated to Saint Michael. Following war damage in the 14th century it was rebuilt as a fortified church. In 1803 St. Michael's was elevated to cathedral status, replacing the earlier cathedral dedicated to Saints Nazarius and Celsus, now the Basilica of St. Nazaire and St. Celse.

The cathedral plan is characterised by its relative simplicity. It forms a single nave with a 20 metre high vault, lined with several lateral chapels. The chior screen has retained its 14th century stained glass. The sober façade has a single decorative feature in the form of a large rosette 8 meters in diameter, and the adjoining bell tower is relatively massive.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MrsWayfarer (4 months ago)
We attended Sunday mass here and it was very solemn. I liked how the stained glass provided the church different light shades. Nice church for quiet contemplation and prayer.
James Parker (2 years ago)
Gothic churches are cool. Gothic fashion, not so much.
Marie Holm, PhD (2 years ago)
Impressive cathedral, with looming ambiance and sparkles of light shining through the stained glass. Only downside for the moment is the maintenance work around it, but once done the paths will be smooth and such.
viv Ketchen (4 years ago)
Just a beautiful serene place.
Nancy Fink (4 years ago)
Beautiful Romanesque cathedral with low door. Painting of walls and columns a la Middle Ages is superb. Early Gothic additions near altar shows changes as church got bigger.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Historic City of Trogir

The historic city of Trogir is situated on a small island between the Croatian mainland and the island of Čiovo. Since 1997, it has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites for its Venetian architecture.

Trogir has 2300 years of continuous urban tradition. Its culture was created under the influence of the ancient Greeks, and then the Romans, and Venetians. Trogir has a high concentration of palaces, churches, and towers, as well as a fortress on a small island. The orthogonal street plan of this island settlement dates back to the Hellenistic period and it was embellished by successive rulers with many fine public and domestic buildings and fortifications. Its beautiful Romanesque churches are complemented by the outstanding Renaissance and Baroque buildings from the Venetian period.

Trogir is the best-preserved Romanesque-Gothic complex not only in the Adriatic, but in all of Central Europe. Trogir's medieval core, surrounded by walls, comprises a preserved castle and tower and a series of dwellings and palaces from the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Trogir's grandest building is the church of St. Lawrence, whose main west portal is a masterpiece by Radovan, and the most significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia.