Château de Quéribus

Cucugnan, France

Château de Quéribus is a ruined castle in the commune of Cucugnan. It is one of the 'Five Sons of Carcassonne', along with Aguilar, Peyrepertuse, Termes and Puilaurens: five castles strategically placed to defend the French border against the Spanish, until the border was moved in 1659.

Quéribus was first time mentioned in 1021 when it was one of the main Barcelonan strongholds north of the Pyrenees.

It is sometimes regarded as the last Cathar stronghold. After the fall of Montségur in 1244 surviving Cathars gathered together in another mountain-top stronghold on the border of Aragon. In 1255, a French army was dispatched to deal with these remaining Cathars, but they slipped away without a fight, probably to Aragon or Piedmont - both regions where Cathar beliefs were still common, and where the Occitan language was spoken.

Quéribus is high and isolated. It stands on top of the highest peak for miles around. In 1951 restoration work on the turret began, and between 1998-2002 a complete restoration of the castle was undertaken: the castle is now accessible to visitors.

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Address

Cucugnan, France
See all sites in Cucugnan

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wilhelm Scheidel (18 months ago)
We had a very windy day but up there the view was fantastic and the secret path to the lower defence chamber was extraordinary
Roger Garriga (19 months ago)
One of the best catarian castles!! Great views on the top!!
Blake Jones (19 months ago)
Great experience. If you struggle with heights you may find this chalanging
Amir Hefni (19 months ago)
Simply amazing! An incredible castle right on top of a mountain! Strongly recommend a visit.
姜宣宇 (20 months ago)
It is a nice fort with amazing view and extreme windy on the top. I also lost my drone near the top because of the wind
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