Château de Quéribus

Cucugnan, France

Château de Quéribus is a ruined castle in the commune of Cucugnan. It is one of the 'Five Sons of Carcassonne', along with Aguilar, Peyrepertuse, Termes and Puilaurens: five castles strategically placed to defend the French border against the Spanish, until the border was moved in 1659.

Quéribus was first time mentioned in 1021 when it was one of the main Barcelonan strongholds north of the Pyrenees.

It is sometimes regarded as the last Cathar stronghold. After the fall of Montségur in 1244 surviving Cathars gathered together in another mountain-top stronghold on the border of Aragon. In 1255, a French army was dispatched to deal with these remaining Cathars, but they slipped away without a fight, probably to Aragon or Piedmont - both regions where Cathar beliefs were still common, and where the Occitan language was spoken.

Quéribus is high and isolated. It stands on top of the highest peak for miles around. In 1951 restoration work on the turret began, and between 1998-2002 a complete restoration of the castle was undertaken: the castle is now accessible to visitors.

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Cucugnan, France
See all sites in Cucugnan

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lucie la Boxer (14 months ago)
Absolut amazing point. Must see before die!
Andrew Ding (15 months ago)
We did the walk from the town- hard going up on the red route but worth it - disappointing was the price to go up to the castle once we got there . I would guess most of the money goes to maintaining the shop and salaries and nothing for the castle itself
Alex M Bustillo (16 months ago)
Beautiful visit
Ruben RCL (17 months ago)
EXCELLENT views.. magnificent
Tana Moon (17 months ago)
Well worth the hike to the top - on a clear day you can enjoy the Pyrenees in one direction and the Mediterranean to the other. It's breezy up there
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