Toulouse Roman Amphitheatre

Toulouse, France

The amphitheatre of Toulouse-Purpan is constructed on a filled structure, unlike those in Arles, Nîmes, and the Colosseum in Rome, where a hollow structure composed of vaults and pillars supports the tiers. The cavea (the rows of seats intended to receive the public) is fifteen meters wide. This area is separated from the arena by a wall and bound at the outside by a high wall covered in brick. The cavea is divided into equal segments compartmentalized by twenty-three arched horizontal corridors, the vomitoria.

The main entrance to the amphitheatre is located to the north of the arena and is 4.20 meters wide. The arch reproduces the height of the curved vault, which once covered the entry passage. The almond-like arena is sixty-two meters long by forty-six meters wide. Underneath this surface lies an underground network of drains, which leads to a vast ruined well in the center. This well catches the rainwater and allows for the rapid drainage of the arena, even today.

Abandoned at the end of the fourth century, the amphitheatre came to serve as a quarry. In this manner, the monument was completely stripped of its brick facing.

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Details

Founded: 40 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

elisabelle taupiac (2 years ago)
Too bad the amphitheater is not accessible and the space remains unused, big lack. Nevertheless it is beautiful and the playground is really good, to be developed
Murielle Gliszczynski (3 years ago)
There were a lot of people and some do not respect the smallest damage
F. Lahbabi (3 years ago)
It was closed when we got there due to construction. Pity !
Rn Cls (3 years ago)
Amphitheater open only for specific events. Fairly well preserved and clean.
Titia Koala (4 years ago)
It's nice to have such ancient heritage in Toulouse! Good on the other hand you have to have a little imagination to visualize how it could be at the time ...
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