Toulouse Roman Amphitheatre

Toulouse, France

The amphitheatre of Toulouse-Purpan is constructed on a filled structure, unlike those in Arles, Nîmes, and the Colosseum in Rome, where a hollow structure composed of vaults and pillars supports the tiers. The cavea (the rows of seats intended to receive the public) is fifteen meters wide. This area is separated from the arena by a wall and bound at the outside by a high wall covered in brick. The cavea is divided into equal segments compartmentalized by twenty-three arched horizontal corridors, the vomitoria.

The main entrance to the amphitheatre is located to the north of the arena and is 4.20 meters wide. The arch reproduces the height of the curved vault, which once covered the entry passage. The almond-like arena is sixty-two meters long by forty-six meters wide. Underneath this surface lies an underground network of drains, which leads to a vast ruined well in the center. This well catches the rainwater and allows for the rapid drainage of the arena, even today.

Abandoned at the end of the fourth century, the amphitheatre came to serve as a quarry. In this manner, the monument was completely stripped of its brick facing.

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Details

Founded: 40 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mathieu Longo (20 months ago)
Fermé une partie de l'année. On en fait vite le tour. Heureusement, le prix de l'entrée au site n'est pas cher.
Eva Arangoïs (20 months ago)
Vraiment sympathique mais sans accompagnateur c'est compliqué de comprendre quoi que ce soit puisqu'il n'y a pas de panneaux.
Arno (21 months ago)
L'architecture de l'amphithéâtre de Tolosa est carcatérisée par l'utilisation de la brique et d'une structure pleine.
Mehfou M (2 years ago)
Je n'y suis pas resté longtemps mais je n'ai vue aucune personne après 10 minutes d'attente le jour où je me trouvé la bas donc pour ma part le services est long mais quand la personne est arrivé on ma proposer un service de bonne qualité ! Merci .
Karo M (2 years ago)
La visite guidée( 1h 30 environ pour les l'amphi et les thermes ) est indispensable pour accompagner la visite des thermes et l'amphithéâtre sinon vous allez penser que vous vous êtes déplacés pour pas grand chose alors que c'est un lieu magnifique chargé d'histoire et qu'il y a beaucoup à dire dessus
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