Marcevol Priory is situated at an altitude of 500 metres on a plateau overlooking the Tet Valley. The Priory was built in the 12th century by the religious order of Saint Sepulchre. In 1129 the Bishop of Elne donated them the small church, as well as some surrounding out-buildings. These were monks following the rules of Saint Augustine. The Order of Saint Sepulchre was founded in 1099 after the crusades and the conquest of Jerusalem; its mission was to watch over Christ’s tomb. The Order quickly spread throughout Europe, and received possessions and donations. Marcevol was one of its communities from 1129 to 1484, the year the Pope ordered its dissolution.

In 1484 the building came under the aegis of a community of priests in the parish of Vinça. It was at this time that an altarpiece dedicated to the Virgin was installed in the apse. The community also attached itself to the pardons of the Virgin organisation. This was an old tradition associated with the mother of a Pope travelling to Compostella. She was later buried in the parish church. Marcevol thus became a place of pilgrimage, attracting hundreds of pilgrims hoping to obtain Grace and Indulgence. It is the most important pilgrimage in the Conflent, and every 3rd May a mass is celebrated in Marcevol.

During the French Revolution, the Priory was sold as a National Property; it became the centre of a large agricultural exploitation. The buildings suffered from lack of repair. Then in the 1970’s, to prevent further decay and ruin, the Association de Monastir de Marcevols started doing voluntary building work. They made the Priory into a centre for people with spiritual, artistic and therapeutic callings. In 2001 the association became the ‘Fondation du Prieurie de Marcevol’. It is recognised as a public utility, and continues its public vocation by offering accommodation for groups and school trips, and other cultural activities.

The priory has a remarkable pink marble façade.

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Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.prieure-de-marcevol.fr

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Richard Margail (19 months ago)
Ah les templiers...mais au fait où est passé le trésor ?
michel paredes (2 years ago)
Super village et superbe marche des brasseurs en octobre
Josselyne Lorin (2 years ago)
Lieu superbe, accueil chaleureux et généreux. Merci à tous et à bientôt.
Brian Churchill (2 years ago)
Great walk from Vinca lake
Tony Silvano Di Marco (2 years ago)
A voir et à revoir ! En plus de l'environnement naturel de toute beauté qui l'entoure, empreint de sérénité, le prieuré de Marcevol, superbement restauré, mérite aussi la visite pour son splendide portail en marbre rose surmonté d'un clocher-mur percé de quatre baies. À l'intérieur de l'église à trois nefs est conservée une fresque ancienne représentant le Christ en Majesté. Quand vous êtes dans le coin, n'hésitez pas à faire un détour pour visiter ce lieux magique !
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