Marcevol Priory is situated at an altitude of 500 metres on a plateau overlooking the Tet Valley. The Priory was built in the 12th century by the religious order of Saint Sepulchre. In 1129 the Bishop of Elne donated them the small church, as well as some surrounding out-buildings. These were monks following the rules of Saint Augustine. The Order of Saint Sepulchre was founded in 1099 after the crusades and the conquest of Jerusalem; its mission was to watch over Christ’s tomb. The Order quickly spread throughout Europe, and received possessions and donations. Marcevol was one of its communities from 1129 to 1484, the year the Pope ordered its dissolution.

In 1484 the building came under the aegis of a community of priests in the parish of Vinça. It was at this time that an altarpiece dedicated to the Virgin was installed in the apse. The community also attached itself to the pardons of the Virgin organisation. This was an old tradition associated with the mother of a Pope travelling to Compostella. She was later buried in the parish church. Marcevol thus became a place of pilgrimage, attracting hundreds of pilgrims hoping to obtain Grace and Indulgence. It is the most important pilgrimage in the Conflent, and every 3rd May a mass is celebrated in Marcevol.

During the French Revolution, the Priory was sold as a National Property; it became the centre of a large agricultural exploitation. The buildings suffered from lack of repair. Then in the 1970’s, to prevent further decay and ruin, the Association de Monastir de Marcevols started doing voluntary building work. They made the Priory into a centre for people with spiritual, artistic and therapeutic callings. In 2001 the association became the ‘Fondation du Prieurie de Marcevol’. It is recognised as a public utility, and continues its public vocation by offering accommodation for groups and school trips, and other cultural activities.

The priory has a remarkable pink marble façade.

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Details

Founded: 1129
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.prieure-de-marcevol.fr

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Richard Margail (2 months ago)
Ah les templiers...mais au fait où est passé le trésor ?
michel paredes (7 months ago)
Super village et superbe marche des brasseurs en octobre
Josselyne Lorin (9 months ago)
Lieu superbe, accueil chaleureux et généreux. Merci à tous et à bientôt.
Brian Churchill (12 months ago)
Great walk from Vinca lake
Tony Silvano Di Marco (14 months ago)
A voir et à revoir ! En plus de l'environnement naturel de toute beauté qui l'entoure, empreint de sérénité, le prieuré de Marcevol, superbement restauré, mérite aussi la visite pour son splendide portail en marbre rose surmonté d'un clocher-mur percé de quatre baies. À l'intérieur de l'église à trois nefs est conservée une fresque ancienne représentant le Christ en Majesté. Quand vous êtes dans le coin, n'hésitez pas à faire un détour pour visiter ce lieux magique !
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Porta Nigra

The Porta Nigra (Latin for black gate) is the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The name Porta Nigra originated in the Middle Ages due to the darkened colour of its stone; the original Roman name has not been preserved. Locals commonly refer to the Porta Nigra simply as Porta.

The Porta Nigra was built in grey sandstone between 186 and 200 AD. The original gate consisted of two four-storied towers, projecting as near semicircles on the outer side. A narrow courtyard separated the two gate openings on either side. For unknown reasons, however, the construction of the gate remained unfinished. For example, the stones at the northern (outer) side of the gate were never abraded, and the protruding stones would have made it impossible to install movable gates. Nonetheless, the gate was used for several centuries until the end of the Roman era in Trier.

In Roman times, the Porta Nigra was part of a system of four city gates, one of which stood at each side of the roughly rectangular Roman city. The Porta Nigra guarded the northern entry to the Roman city, while the Porta Alba (White Gate) was built in the east, the Porta Media (Middle Gate) in the south, and the Porta Inclyta (Famous Gate) in the west, next to the Roman bridge across the Moselle. The gates stood at the ends of the two main streets of the Roman Trier, one of which led north-south and the other east-west. Of these gates, only the Porta Nigra still exists today.

In the early Middle Ages the Roman city gates were no longer used for their original function and their stones were taken and reused for other buildings. Also iron and lead braces were broken out of the walls of the Porta Nigra for reuse. Traces of this destruction are still clearly visible on the north side of the gate.

After 1028, the Greek monk Simeon lived as a hermit in the ruins of the Porta Nigra. After his death (1035) and sanctification, the Simeonstift monastery was built next to the Porta Nigra to honor him. Saving it from further destruction, the Porta Nigra was transformed into a church: The inner court of the gate was roofed and intermediate ceilings were inserted. The two middle storeys of the former gate were converted into church naves: the upper storey being for the monks and the lower storey for the general public. The ground floor with the large gates was sealed, and a large outside staircase was constructed alongside the south side (the town side) of the gate, up to the lower storey of the church. A small staircase led further up to the upper storey. The church rooms were accessible through former windows of the western tower of the Porta Nigra that were enlarged to become entrance doors (still visible today). The top floor of the western tower was used as church tower, the eastern tower was leveled, and an apse added at its east side. An additional gate - the much smaller Simeon Gate - was built adjacent to the East side of the Porta Nigra and served as a city gate in medieval times.

In 1802 Napoleon Bonaparte dissolved the church in the Porta Nigra and the monastery beside it, along with the vast majority of Trier"s numerous churches and monasteries. On his visit to Trier in 1804, Napoleon ordered that the Porta Nigra be converted back to its Roman form. Only the apse was kept; but the eastern tower was not rebuilt to its original height. Local legend has it that Napoleon originally wanted to completely tear down the church, but locals convinced him that the church had actually been a Gaulish festival hall before being turned into a church. Another version of the story is that they told him about its Roman origins, persuading him to convert the gate back to its original form.

In 1986 the Porta Nigra was designated a World Heritage Site, along with other Roman monuments in Trier and its surroundings. The modern appearance of the Porta Nigra goes back almost unchanged to the reconstruction ordered by Napoleon. At the south side of the Porta Nigra, remains of Roman columns line the last 100 m of the street leading to the gate. Positioned where they had stood in Roman times, they give a slight impression of the aspect of the original Roman street that was lined with colonnades. The Porta Nigra, including the upper floors, is open to visitors.