Tarvastu Church

Tarvastu, Estonia

The oldest parts of the church in Tarvastu date back to the 14th century. The former church consisted of a square-shaped nave and a choir. The church has suffered in numerous wars and in 1771 it received a new appearance under the supervision of Johann Christoph Knaut. The church caught fire after a stroke of lightning in 1892 and its reconstruction was started in 1893, in December of the very same year the consecration of the reconstructed church took place. The altar painting “Golgatha” is painted by Theodor Thieme in the 1890’s.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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Toomas Kroll (4 years ago)
Anatoly Ko (9 years ago)
Tarvastu Peetri kirik, Tarvastu, Viljandimaa, 58.230046, 25.884624 ‎ 58° 13' 48.17", 25° 53' 4.65 Самые древние части теперешней церкви в Тарвасту относятся примерно к 14 веку. Тогдашняя церковь состояла из прямоугольного продольного здания и помещения хоров. Видны относящиеся к средневековым алтарям ниши на восточной стене хора и в северо-восточном углу продольного здания. Пострадавшая в войнах церковь в 1771 году обрела новый вид благодаря рукам мастера Йохана Кристофа Кнаута. Сгоревшая от молнии в 1892 году церковь стала восстанавливаться, и в декабре 1893 года она была вновь освящена. Проектировщиком и строительным мастером был школьный учитель из Пыльтсамаа Густав Генрих Берманн. Автором алтарной картины «Колгота» является Теодор Тим, 1859, органа – Август Теркман
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