Neu-Ems (also known as Schloss Glopper) is a medieval castle in Hohenems. It was the fortification of the Lords of Ems. The castle is in the mountainside east of the town, in its mountain village Emsreute on a crest above the Rhine valley.

Approved by Emperor Louis IV the Bavarian, Ritter Ulrich I. von Ems (Knight Ulrich I of Ems) in 1343 built a new castle to have a comfortable home for his large family in dangerous times. He placed it near his fortress Alt-Ems on a hilltop.

During the Appenzell Wars in 1407 the castle was destroyed and rebuilt shortly afterwards.

In 1603 a chapel was assembled to the ground floor. Except two lancet windows in the northern wall there is nothing left over of it today. Since 1835 the former winged altar of this chapel is exhibited in the Tyrolean State Museum in Innsbruck.

Since 1843 the stronghold is privately owned by the family Waldburg-Zeil.

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Founded: 1343
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Hannes Gasser (3 years ago)
Schönes Schloss aber leider alles privatbesitz
Holger Meckenstock (4 years ago)
Außen wie innen: Fantastisch! Sehr ungewöhnliche Location mit mega Blick auf's Rheintal.
AZ (4 years ago)
Echt sehenswert, aber in Privatbesitz!
Erna Braito (4 years ago)
War ein großartiges Erlebnis einmal in einem Historischem Schloss einen schönen Abend zu verbringen. Die Renovierungsarbeiten sind sehr liebevoll gestaltet und das Ambiente exzellent.
Christiane Balloté (5 years ago)
Perfect vacation!
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