The Kalanti stone church, today part of Uusikaupunki city, was built between years 1430 and 1450. The interior is covered with famous wall paintings signed by Petrus Henriksson in 1470s. The oldest altarpiece in Finland was originally in the church of Kalanti. It was made by German master Francke in the beginning of 15th century and stood in Kalanti church until 1883. According the local legend, collected in the 19th century, the altarpiece was found floating in the sea outside Kalanti. The altarpiece is now located at the National Museum of Finland.

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Details

Founded: 1430-1450
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Timo Junttila (2 years ago)
KALLE SALONOJA (2 years ago)
Obi Wan Kenobi (2 years ago)
Kaunis kirkko lasten Jumalan palveluksissa Saarnamies syö jäätelöä
Mauno-Juhani Kari (3 years ago)
A somewhat generic looking church with great acoustics for live music. This is also called Uusikaupunki's new church, the older one being closer to Wallila. There are also more than enough seats for most events in this church and the location is also rather optimal. Recommended especially for wedding ceremonies!
Timo Kauppinen (3 years ago)
Mahtava jumalanpalvelus ja hengelliset laulut
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