Linz Old Cathedral

Linz, Austria

The Old Cathedral (Alter Dom) in Linz was built by Jesuits between 1669 and 1683 in Baroque style. From 1785 to 1909 it served as cathedral of the Diocese of Linz.

The church was erected near the former Jesuits' College at the south end of the Hauptplatz. The church was originally called the Church of Ignatius and was dedicated to Saint Ignatius of Loyola, who founded the Jesuit Order.

The Jesuit Order was dissolved in 1773 by Pope Clement XIII. The Diocese of Linz and St. Pölten von Passau was effectively founded in 1783 by a decree of the Emperor Joseph II (1741–90) without advance approval from Rome. The emperor appointed the bishop and designated the former Jesuit church as the cathedral. The diocese was officially established by a papal certificate of 28 January 1785. Bishop Gregorius Thomas Ziegler (1827–52) led an era during which the church was restored. In 1909 the function of cathedral was transferred from the Ignatius church to the new building. The Jesuits returned in 1909.

The exterior of the church is relatively plain, with two towers on either side of the main door, topped with onion domes. The interior is decorated in lavish Baroque style, with pink marble columns. There are three side chapels on either side of a wide main nave.

The church has an elaborately detailed wooden pulpit, and a high altar made by Giovanni Battista Barbarino and Giovanni Battista Colombo that incorporates many statues in marble. Antonio Bellucci (1654–1726) made the painting of Saint Aloysius that is located above the altar. The stalls in the presbytery were carved by local artists, and are decorated with the faces of monsters and dwarfs. The carved choir stalls from the 17th century were transferred from Garsten Abbey. The Baroque organ was built by Franz Xaver Krismann, with alterations requested by Bruckner. The organ has not been modified.

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Address

Domgasse 3, Linz, Austria
See all sites in Linz

Details

Founded: 1669-1683
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandro Tabacchi (2 years ago)
La chiesa o “Duomo vecchio” ha alle spalle quasi 400 anni di storia, ha uno stile particolare dato dal suo bianco puro accompagnato da piccoli decori d’orati. A parte lo splendido organo che non ho avuto l’opportunità di sentire una cos a be mi ha colpito particolarmente sono gli stalli in legno del presbiterio. PS: il leggio al centro della stanza è un po’ fastidioso dato che ci sono andato addosso e quasi lo facevo cadere.
Thomas Stenglein (2 years ago)
Diese schöne Barockkirche sollte man unbedingt anschauen. Die Baumeister haben eine grandiose Arbeit geleistet und es gibt deshalb viel zu sehen. Diese Kirche wurde früher auch als Ignatiuskirche bezeichnet da sie dem Heiligen Ignatius von Loyola gewidmet ist. Herausragend sind der Altar, das Chorgestühl, die Kanzel und die Brucknerorgel.
chethan (3 years ago)
I don't hate it!
Wolfgang Hofer (3 years ago)
Wunderschöne Kirche mit imposanten Fenstern und einer spannenden Geschichte. Für Linz Touristen ein absoluter Pflichtbesuch. Hier kann außerdem eine Eremiten Erfahrung gebucht werden. Einer der schönsten Kirchen Mitteleuropas
Erkan Akdoğan (3 years ago)
A perfect example of doms of its time, Alter Dom looks after Linzer Hauptplatz.
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