Linz New Cathedral

Linz, Austria

The New Cathedral (Mariä-Empfängnis-Dom) construction plans were started in 1855 by Bishop Franz-Josef Rudigier. The first stone was laid in 1862. In 1924 Bishop Johannes Maria Gföllner consecrated the finished building as the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. The plans, drawn by the master builder of the Archdiocese of Cologne, Vincenz Statz, were made in the French high Gothic style.

With 20,000 seats, the cathedral is the largest (130 meters long, and the ground 5,170 square meters), but not the highest, church in Austria. The originally-planned, higher spire was not approved, because in Austria-Hungary at the time, no building was allowed to be taller than the South Tower of the St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna. At 135 m, the New Cathedral is two meters shorter than the Viennese cathedral.

Particularly noteworthy are the cathedral's stained-glass windows. The most famous is the Linz Window, which depicts the history of Linz. The windows also contain portraits of the various sponsors of the church's construction. During the Second World War some windows, particularly in the southern part of the cathedral, were damaged. Instead of restoring the original windows, they have been replaced with windows displaying modern art. Also noteworthy is the nativity scene in the church burial vault, with its figures made by S. Osterrieder, and the display of the regalia of Bishop Rudigier.

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Address

Hafnerstraße 11, Linz, Austria
See all sites in Linz

Details

Founded: 1862-1924
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

nightsun1984 (17 months ago)
One of the most beautiful cathedrals. Beautiful murals, mosaics and statues. It's court is used for many national and international festivities.
Kate Kosche (18 months ago)
Neo-baroque cathedral in Linz, apparently built not because there was anything wrong with the "old" cathedral but for political purposes in the 19th century. The best reason to visit is to see the fantastic modern stained glass windows near the rear of the cathedral. The original windows were destroyed in the war and the modern replacements are spectacular!
ali mansouri tazekand (19 months ago)
Fantastic architecture, fabulous scenery. Elderly folks might have difficulties going up.
GARYPUSSY (2 years ago)
Breathtakingly beautiful. Try and enter at the end of the cathedral and not the side. I personally thought it better than Vienna Cathedral. Loved Linz as well.
Dari Garibaldi (2 years ago)
I really loved it. I only saw the inside: neogothic cathedral. If you like this kind of architecture, then you should definitely visit it. (Sorry for photo quality: I'm still not used to new phone).
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