Linz New Cathedral

Linz, Austria

The New Cathedral (Mariä-Empfängnis-Dom) construction plans were started in 1855 by Bishop Franz-Josef Rudigier. The first stone was laid in 1862. In 1924 Bishop Johannes Maria Gföllner consecrated the finished building as the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. The plans, drawn by the master builder of the Archdiocese of Cologne, Vincenz Statz, were made in the French high Gothic style.

With 20,000 seats, the cathedral is the largest (130 meters long, and the ground 5,170 square meters), but not the highest, church in Austria. The originally-planned, higher spire was not approved, because in Austria-Hungary at the time, no building was allowed to be taller than the South Tower of the St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna. At 135 m, the New Cathedral is two meters shorter than the Viennese cathedral.

Particularly noteworthy are the cathedral's stained-glass windows. The most famous is the Linz Window, which depicts the history of Linz. The windows also contain portraits of the various sponsors of the church's construction. During the Second World War some windows, particularly in the southern part of the cathedral, were damaged. Instead of restoring the original windows, they have been replaced with windows displaying modern art. Also noteworthy is the nativity scene in the church burial vault, with its figures made by S. Osterrieder, and the display of the regalia of Bishop Rudigier.

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Address

Hafnerstraße 11, Linz, Austria
See all sites in Linz

Details

Founded: 1862-1924
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bojan Petrovic (2 months ago)
Extremely fantastic experience! The tallest and largest cathedral in Austria. Has amazing story about construction. Simply beautiful.
Bogdan Kovalskyi (3 months ago)
Magnificent cathedral with interesting architecture. Reconstruction works had brought some interesting details which are harmonically merged with old architecture.
ARSHAD AHMAD (6 months ago)
The church is one of the beautiful and largest cathedral churches I have seen so far. It is located almost in the city center of Linz. It is a well maintained church with amazing architecture. It is more spacious and one of the largest cathedral churches in Austria. I am impressed notably the cathedral stained glass window and the most famous is the Linz Window which marvelously shows the history of Linz. In a nutshell it's a must visit place in Linz.
Iaroslav Piskarov (10 months ago)
Just another big cathedral from outside, but totally overwhelming from inside. The interior is tremendous. Absolutely must when in Linz and I believe worth a little detour if you're passing somehow close to the town
Maqbool Khan (11 months ago)
The New Cathedral of Meriendom is a largest church in Austria in terms of seating capacity. This new cathedral is huge and quiet oasis in the center of city with its open and contemporary interior. It’s colorful stained-glass windows are also spectacular and interesting for visitors.
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