Lamberg Castle

Steyr, Austria

Schloss Lamberg originates from the 10th century and was first time mentioned in 985 AD. It was called Styraburg and owned by the Traungauer family (of the Otakare branch). Later the castle was moved to to the hands of Bamberg and Habsburg families.

In 1666 the castle was acquired by Count of Lamberg. After a fire was destroyed the old castle in 1727 the new palace was built. It was damaged in the Napoleonic Wars in 1800, 1805 and 1809. Today the Lamberg castle is used for cultural events.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Panoramaweg, Steyr, Austria
See all sites in Steyr

Details

Founded: 985 AD / 18th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nazariy Mamrokha (12 months ago)
Worth seeing, beautiful yard with goats!))
Antonio Ezio Frascarelli (12 months ago)
Nice place to visit. Horrible statues but worth spending some time around the city.
Andrea Aparo (2 years ago)
Nice for few hours visit
Nikolaus Bolen (2 years ago)
So beautiful. On one side you can observe the residents
Cate Deli (2 years ago)
it is a beautiful old castle overlooking styria, which offers during summer on fridays concerts and has an incredible library which is hundreds of years old. The close by park has a unique beauty with a lot of little cute statues and fountains. It is definitely worth to visit during a stay in styria
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.