The first written document of castle in Linz dates from 799 AD, during the reign of Charlemagne. Today there are still some walls of this castle, together with bastions and the Friedrich Gate, named after Emperor Friedrich III, who resided here until his death in 1493. As the temporary heart of the Habsburg Empire, Linz was raised by the Emperor to the status of provincial capital. In the 17th century, Rudolf II rebuilt the castle, which today is home to the Upper Austrian provincial Museum.

The south wing was destroyed in the City Fire of 1800, and was rebuilt in modern glass-and-steel architecture for the Capital of Culture year 2009. It now constitute the largest universal museum in Austria. The wings of Linz Castle contain the history of culture collections of the Upper Austrian Provincial Museum. The permanent exhibitions present a walk through the artistic and cultural history of Upper Austria from the Neolithic Age up to the 20th century. The new South Wing contains the permanent exhibitions on nature and technology in Upper Austria. There is a continuous programme of special exhibitions.

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Address

Schlossberg 1, Linz, Austria
See all sites in Linz

Details

Founded: 8th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.linz.at

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stepan (4 years ago)
A nice city view. Interesting exhibitions for a good admission.
Anak Agung Mataram (4 years ago)
Best musium i ever see in this planet
Eric Pankhurst (4 years ago)
Best Musium visited for a very long time, total surprise
Frank Deboeck (4 years ago)
Impressive museum, but not enough English explanations next to the German text. This could be a major improvement.
Victor Fabio Suarez Chilma (4 years ago)
It's a wonderful place. The museum collect a complete memory about the culture and customs from Upper Austrian. Completely recommended
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Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.