The first written document of castle in Linz dates from 799 AD, during the reign of Charlemagne. Today there are still some walls of this castle, together with bastions and the Friedrich Gate, named after Emperor Friedrich III, who resided here until his death in 1493. As the temporary heart of the Habsburg Empire, Linz was raised by the Emperor to the status of provincial capital. In the 17th century, Rudolf II rebuilt the castle, which today is home to the Upper Austrian provincial Museum.

The south wing was destroyed in the City Fire of 1800, and was rebuilt in modern glass-and-steel architecture for the Capital of Culture year 2009. It now constitute the largest universal museum in Austria. The wings of Linz Castle contain the history of culture collections of the Upper Austrian Provincial Museum. The permanent exhibitions present a walk through the artistic and cultural history of Upper Austria from the Neolithic Age up to the 20th century. The new South Wing contains the permanent exhibitions on nature and technology in Upper Austria. There is a continuous programme of special exhibitions.

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Address

Schlossberg 1, Linz, Austria
See all sites in Linz

Details

Founded: 8th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.linz.at

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stepan (2 years ago)
A nice city view. Interesting exhibitions for a good admission.
Anak Agung Mataram (2 years ago)
Best musium i ever see in this planet
Eric Pankhurst (2 years ago)
Best Musium visited for a very long time, total surprise
Frank Deboeck (2 years ago)
Impressive museum, but not enough English explanations next to the German text. This could be a major improvement.
Victor Fabio Suarez Chilma (2 years ago)
It's a wonderful place. The museum collect a complete memory about the culture and customs from Upper Austrian. Completely recommended
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