St. Florian Monastery

Sankt Florian, Austria

St. Florian Monastery is the largest monastery in Upper Austria, and one the most impressive examples of Baroque architecture in Austria. The monastery is dedicated to Saint Florian, whose fourth century grave lies beneath the monastery.

The monastery, named after Saint Florian, was founded in the Carolingian period. Since 1071 it has housed a community of Augustinian Canons, and is thus is one of the oldest operational monasteries in the world following the Rule of St. Augustine.

Between 1686 and 1708 the monastery complex was reconstructed in Baroque style by Carlo Antonio Carlone, whose masterpiece is St. Florian's. After his death, Jakob Prandtauer continued the work. The result is the biggest Baroque monastery in Upper Austria. Bartolomeo Altomonte created the frescoes.

Construction of the library wing began in 1744, under Johann Gotthard Hayberger. The library comprises about 130,000 items, including many manuscripts. The gallery contains numerous works of the 16th and 17th centuries, but also some late medieval works of the Danube School, particularly by Albrecht Altdorfer.

In 1827, Polish librarian Father Josef Chmel found one of the oldest Polish literary artifacts, an illuminated manuscript containing the Psalms in Latin, German and Polish in the monastery. Because of the site of discovery, it has been named the Sankt Florian Psalter, and now resides in the National Library of Poland.

In January 1941, the Gestapo seized the facility and expelled the monks. The canons returned after the end of the war.

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Founded: 1071
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

W F J Janssen (2 years ago)
Fabulous is not enough to catch the grandiosity in words
Günther Pfisterer (2 years ago)
A wonderful place, we enjoyed in August with the Concerts of St. Florianer Brucknertage
Stanka Andraković (2 years ago)
Unreal, beautiful, not to miss. Guide was also perfect
Melané Fahner-Botha (2 years ago)
Moving , beautiful and fascinating. Worth every minute and penny and then relax in the peaceful garden over a choice between traditional Austrian dishes or the unexpected luxury of vegan food in monastery garden!
Random Traveller (2 years ago)
I DO NOT RECOMMEND anyone to stay in the guest house unless you want to bring some BOOKLICE with you back home (which is what of course happened). The bugs are everywhere, crawling on every wall, even in the dining room. If you know you have this problem and you are still renting rooms, that's just bad faith. Edit: I appreciate your responsiveness, though a refund really wouldn't make a difference for me. If you really are becoming aware of this issue only now and want to really do something about it, then don't allow the guest house to be used until it's resolved.
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