St. Florian Monastery

Sankt Florian, Austria

St. Florian Monastery is the largest monastery in Upper Austria, and one the most impressive examples of Baroque architecture in Austria. The monastery is dedicated to Saint Florian, whose fourth century grave lies beneath the monastery.

The monastery, named after Saint Florian, was founded in the Carolingian period. Since 1071 it has housed a community of Augustinian Canons, and is thus is one of the oldest operational monasteries in the world following the Rule of St. Augustine.

Between 1686 and 1708 the monastery complex was reconstructed in Baroque style by Carlo Antonio Carlone, whose masterpiece is St. Florian's. After his death, Jakob Prandtauer continued the work. The result is the biggest Baroque monastery in Upper Austria. Bartolomeo Altomonte created the frescoes.

Construction of the library wing began in 1744, under Johann Gotthard Hayberger. The library comprises about 130,000 items, including many manuscripts. The gallery contains numerous works of the 16th and 17th centuries, but also some late medieval works of the Danube School, particularly by Albrecht Altdorfer.

In 1827, Polish librarian Father Josef Chmel found one of the oldest Polish literary artifacts, an illuminated manuscript containing the Psalms in Latin, German and Polish in the monastery. Because of the site of discovery, it has been named the Sankt Florian Psalter, and now resides in the National Library of Poland.

In January 1941, the Gestapo seized the facility and expelled the monks. The canons returned after the end of the war.

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Founded: 1071
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eduardo b (14 months ago)
Very impressive abbey
Alexandre Botermans (14 months ago)
Simply stunning. This is a must see. The atmosphere is serene. Church, Monastery and surroundings are beautiful. The staff is very friendly and passionate about the Monastery and its History. I recommend everyone to come and see the beauty and calmness of this landmark (don’t miss the Bibliotheca!! Such a powerful place loaded with years of History). Thanks again to the Staff and the small tour.
Gert Kopera (21 months ago)
Simply beautiful. Well kept, serene, stunning
wendy newell (3 years ago)
Small but very interesting abbey. Audio guide OK and our guide had some English and was very friendly. Impressive library and crypt and church organ. Church was being used for Confirmation service so felt like a living place. Nice experience altogether.
Suvendu Das (3 years ago)
The Augustinian Monastery of St. Florian is a place of encounter and devotion, the cultural center of the region and a treasure of the Austrian Baroque. Particularly noteworthy are the library with more than 150,000 volumes, the Imperial Marble Hall, the Sebastian altar by Albrecht Altdorfer, the tomb with the sarcophagus Anton Bruckner and the "Bruckner organ" in the monastery basilica. St. Florian is known as a place of pilgrimage far beyond the borders of Austria. Saint Florian is said to have been buried there and the famous composer Anton Bruckner has found his final resting place here.
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