Senftenberg Castle

Senftenberg, Austria

Senftenberg Castle was mentioned first time in 1197. In the 13th century it belonged to the Zebringer family and between the 14th and 15th centuries to the Wallseern family. The castle was destroyed during the rebellion in 1407-1409 and rebuilt later. It was a refuge place during the Siege of Vienna in the Ottoman Wars. The castle was finally destroyed by the Swedish troops in the Thirty Years' War in 1645. Today still impressive ruins with three gates and square keep exist.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Helmuth Mayrhofer (6 months ago)
Gut erhaltene und durch den Burgverein vorbildlich instandgesetzte Burgruine, mit diversen Aus- und Zubauten zur Belebung der Burg und für diverse Veranstaltungen. Die Aussenanlagen der Burg sind frei zugänglich. Dass Innere bleibt dem Besucher jedoch leider verschlossen. Schöner Ausblick auf den Ort Senftenbach und das Kremstal. Ein Ausflug auf die Burg lohnt sich allemal.
joelwhitemusic (10 months ago)
A fantastic old ruin and great space for functions and events. Fantastic hosts, Very well looked after every time we visit.
David Filosofem (11 months ago)
Stunning Scenery, wonderfully renewed castle.
Klaus müller (14 months ago)
Top
Michal Štván (3 years ago)
It really fits to this piece of land. It reminds me Moravia
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Baths of Caracalla

The Baths of Caracalla were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, in Rome. It was built between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla. They would have had to install over 2,000t of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. 

The baths remained in use until the 6th century when the complex was taken by the Ostrogoths during the Gothic War, at which time the hydraulic installations were destroyed. The bath was free and open to the public. The earthquake of 847 destroyed much of the building, along with many other Roman structures.

The building was heated by a hypocaust, a system of burning coal and wood underneath the ground to heat water provided by a dedicated aqueduct. It was in use up to the 19th century. The Aqua Antoniniana aqueduct, a branch of the earlier Aqua Marcia, by Caracalla was specifically built to serve the baths. It was most likely reconstructed by Garbrecht and Manderscheid to its current place.

In the 19th and early 20th century, the design of the baths was used as the inspiration for several modern structures, including St George's Hall in Liverpool and the original Pennsylvania Station in New York City. At the 1960 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the gymnastics events.