Elinghem Church Ruins

Hangvar, Sweden

Elinghem church was built in the 13th century and probably abandoned in the early 17th century. The altar with piscina and baptismal font still remain.

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Address

684, Hangvar, Sweden
See all sites in Hangvar

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.guteinfo.com

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin - (2 years ago)
Väl värd att svänga förbi när man är i närheten.
A-C B (2 years ago)
Adressen "Hangvar Bäcks 216" är felaktig. Har hur länge som helst försökt att ändra men det går inte. Hangvar Bäcks 216 är min privata adress och jag bor inte vid ödekyrkan. Är trött på alla bilar som kör fel.
Manfred Arlt (2 years ago)
Die Kirche wurde Mitte des 13. Jahrhunderts gebaut. Erhalten ist noch der Kalksteinaltar.
Pelle Avelin (3 years ago)
Lite spännande plats för barnen. Fint ffa på våren/försommaren.
Karl Falck (3 years ago)
Trevlig plats att stanna till vid. Dock inget man tar en längre omväg för.
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