Hall in Tirol Abbey

Hall in Tirol, Austria

In the 15th and 16th century, Hall in Tirol was one of the most important towns in the Habsburg Empire. This period saw the construction of many of the churches, monasteries and convents that still shape the appearance of the town. Today Hall has the biggest intact old town in the western part of Austria.

1567 saw the founding of Hall Convent and the neighbouring Jesuit monastery. Before then the Augustinian monastery was near the Salvatorkirche. This was followed by the opening of the Franciscan Monastery (1645) and the Poor Clare Monastery (1723) near what is now the psychiatric hospital. Of the two monasteries, only the Franciscan Monastery remains today. Other orders were founded in the 19th century: the Sisters of the Holy Cross, the Sisters of Charity and the Salesian Sisters.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

www.hall-wattens.at

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katharina Mair (3 years ago)
absolutely nice dear made children's theater for Christmas! Nice stage design, cool actors! easy to understand and funny! Even my 3 year old was fully, even if he did not understand everything! Top!!!
David Huber (3 years ago)
Great children's theater
Roman Frei (3 years ago)
Gottfried Puchner (4 years ago)
Nach meiner Meinung, für Kinder wäre ein Märchen besser als eine Liebesgeschichte.
Gottfried Puchner (4 years ago)
In my opinion, for children, a fairy tale would be better than a love story.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.