Hasegg Castle construction was completed soon after 1300, when Hall was rapidly becoming the center of Tyrolean commerce and salt mining. The building was originally erected to protect the salt mines, the shipping industry, the bridge across the river Inn and the old Roman Road. The castle's mint was established by Sigismund, Archduke of Austria in 1477. The first dollar-size silver coin was struck in 1486.

When Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria had the old mint transferred from the Castle of Sparberegg to Hasegg in 1567, Hall experienced a decisive upswing. Between 1748 and 1768, Hasegg Castle became universally famous for its minting of silver Thalers of which it produced over 17 million specimens.

The mint ceased production in 1806 due to the Napoleonic Wars and the increasing lack of local silver resources.

The mint in Hasegg Castle is a museum now, and open to the general public. Demonstrations of historical minting techniques are given from time to time. The castle itself is an example of early Gothic era Tirolean fortress architecture. The pointed roof of the mint tower is of heavily tarnished copper.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.tyrol.tl
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dr. Nizam Uddin Anon (17 months ago)
Excellent natural view, Mind peaceful historical place.
Leo Brandt (2 years ago)
Yes very nice here. I started a heist, sadly all coins are no longer valid
Bogdan Garkusha (2 years ago)
Very interesting museum. Incredible how big influence this small city had on mint history in the world. There are also nice view from the top of the tower. You can also make one coin with picture of old coin at the end of the journey through museum. If you have Hall city welcome card from your hotel, don't forget to show it to get some discount.
Mike Pennacchi (3 years ago)
When in Hall, you must visit the Hall Mint. This is a nice view of the history of minting coins. Even if you're not a coin collector, it's a get chance to see how the minting process has developed over the centuries. The tower climb is worth the extra few Euros.
G V (3 years ago)
The place is the first modern mint using industrial machines to mint coins. The tour is not made interesting. The movie on TV has so much bass it's hard to make out what is said. The exhibits are ok, no attempt to weave a story. The humor in the audio visuals is a little heavy and forced.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.