Göss Abbey is a former Benedictine nunnery and former Cathedral in Leoben. The nunnery was founded in 1004 by Adula of Leoben, wife of Count Aribo I, and her son, the future Archbishop of Mainz, on the family's ancestral lands. It was settled by canonesses from Nonnberg Abbey in Salzburg. The first abbess was Kunigunde, sister of Archbishop Aribo. Göss was made an Imperial abbey by Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor, in 1020. The Benedictine Rule was introduced in the 12th century.

Göss Abbey functioned for centuries as a centre for the Styrian aristocracy to have their daughters educated and if necessary accommodated, and entry was strictly limited to members of the nobility.

The nunnery, the last remaining Imperial abbey on Habsburg lands, was dissolved in 1782 in the course of the rationalist reforms of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor, and from 1786 served for a short time as the seat of the newly founded Bishopric of Leoben, of which the former abbey church, dedicated to Saint Mary and Saint Andrew, was the cathedral. The first and only bishop died in 1800, and from 1808 the diocese was administered by the Bishops of Seckau until it was formally abolished in 1859. In 1827 the premises were auctioned off and acquired by the wheelwrights' co-operative of Vordernberg, who were primarily interested in the forests of the former abbey's estates. In 1860 the buildings were acquired by a brewer from Graz (the nunnery had had its own brewer since 1459) and have since then been used as a brewery, the Brauerei Göß.

The former abbey church, briefly the cathedral of Leoben, is now used as a parish church. It is a large late Gothic building containing an early Romanesque crypt beneath the choir, some important early Gothic frescoes in the chapel of Saint Michael and an imposing roof.

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Address

Stift 5, Leoben, Austria
See all sites in Leoben

Details

Founded: 1004
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Prein (2 years ago)
Wir haben im Stift unsere Wohnung. Besser geht's nicht.
zoltan sandor (2 years ago)
Ez a templom a Gösser sör főzde udvarán található . Nagyon szép patináns épület mej a mai napig üzemel . Ajánlom mindenki számára , hogy nézze meg !
Barbara Kammerhofer (2 years ago)
Wunderschöner adventmarkt
kim stefan (2 years ago)
Das Stift Göss ist ein ehemaliges Kloster der Benediktinerinnen (OSB) in Göss, einem Stadtteil von Leoben in Österreich. Heute nicht mehr erhalten sind die Pfarrkirche, der Friedhof und die Bauten westlich der Stiftskirche. Bekannt ist auch das Brunnhöfl, welches noch zum größten Teil erhalten ist. Im Schauraum des Stiftes ist auch ein wiederverwendbarer und nach unten aufklappbarer Josephinischer Sarg von 1784 zu bewundern.
Manfred Rieser (2 years ago)
Das älteste steirische Kloster mit Architektur- und Kunstschätzen sowie einer frühromanischen Krypta lohnt immer einen Besuch. Außerdem ist in den Sommermonaten die Besichtigung des Dachstuhls möglich. (Optimale Kombinationsmöglichkeit mit der Gösser Brauerei).
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