Saint Andrea Church

Nago-torbole, Italy

Saint Andrea church overlooks over the older part of Torbole. It was first mentioned in a document dated 1175. In 1183 the Pope Lucius III assigned it, together with the surrounding olive grove, to the Cistercian Abbey of Saint Lorenzo in Trento. In 1497 some of the properties of the Church were given for the support of a priest who would look after of the Torbole Community. In 1741 the curate of Torbole has been founded and in 1839 the church was officially consecrated.

After being ravaged by French troops in 1703, the church was rebuilt in the Late Baroque style, but some architectural elements have been recovered. This is proven by the dates sculptured on the base of the two rocky arches of the transept. From an artistic point of view the most important work of the whole church is the altar piece in the apse. It represents the martyrdom of Saint Andrea and it is the masterpiece of the Verona artist Giambettino Cignaroli (1706–1770). All the figures of the painting, really detailed and realistic, should have been conceived taking as models some inhabitants of Torbole. A painted vertical sundial can be seen on the church's lake facing wall and on the opposite side is a small cemetery. The parish Saint Andrea church is divided into three naves and keeps a fine wooden chorus. A significant element is the 18th-century canvas made by Giambettino Cignaroli representing the Saint Andrea martyr.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

lucia floriani (20 months ago)
Klaus Winstel (2 years ago)
Schöne Kirche umgeben von alten Olivenbäumen mit Aussicht auf den Gardasee. Schöner Aussichtspunkt in Torbole bietet sich an wenn man im Ort ist. Kurzer Fußweg vom Ort zur leicht erhöhten Kirche. Teilweise über Treppen, deshalb nicht für Rollstuhl geeignet. Die Kirche ist von einem kleinen Park aus Olivenbäumen umgeben.
Mariacarla Cirolli (2 years ago)
Judith Tonelli (3 years ago)
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