Saint Andrea Church

Nago-torbole, Italy

Saint Andrea church overlooks over the older part of Torbole. It was first mentioned in a document dated 1175. In 1183 the Pope Lucius III assigned it, together with the surrounding olive grove, to the Cistercian Abbey of Saint Lorenzo in Trento. In 1497 some of the properties of the Church were given for the support of a priest who would look after of the Torbole Community. In 1741 the curate of Torbole has been founded and in 1839 the church was officially consecrated.

After being ravaged by French troops in 1703, the church was rebuilt in the Late Baroque style, but some architectural elements have been recovered. This is proven by the dates sculptured on the base of the two rocky arches of the transept. From an artistic point of view the most important work of the whole church is the altar piece in the apse. It represents the martyrdom of Saint Andrea and it is the masterpiece of the Verona artist Giambettino Cignaroli (1706–1770). All the figures of the painting, really detailed and realistic, should have been conceived taking as models some inhabitants of Torbole. A painted vertical sundial can be seen on the church's lake facing wall and on the opposite side is a small cemetery. The parish Saint Andrea church is divided into three naves and keeps a fine wooden chorus. A significant element is the 18th-century canvas made by Giambettino Cignaroli representing the Saint Andrea martyr.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Media Salerno Project (2 years ago)
S. Andrea Historical News 1146 - 1155 (general term) The chapel of Sant'Andrea is mentioned for the first time in a will, dated in the month of November of an unspecified year between 1146 and 1155. Description The parish church of Sant'Andrea, facing south-east, is located at the top of a steep staircase, on a hill overlooking Lake Garda. The building was subject to several extensions over the centuries. The façade is marked by four Corinthian pilasters, concluded by a mixtilinear crowning and opened by an architraved portal surmounted by a blind window. The bell tower is set against the northern side. The interior is divided into three naves: the lateral ones end in two chapels, the central one in a rectangular presbytery raised on two steps and concluded by a polygonal apse.
Paulina (2 years ago)
It is true that we were not inside, but the location of the church among the olive grove makes it a pleasant place to take a walk and breathe from the city noise. The scenic Busatte-Tempesta route begins nearby
le difese del lago idro durante la grande guerra (2 years ago)
The church is nothing transcendental like the paintings inside but you have a nice view of the lake from the churchyard.
Francesco Della Valle (3 years ago)
The church is not that great but the view is really worth a visit. To visit absolutely.
Cinzia Ceccolin (3 years ago)
A truly enchanting and peaceful place. A magnificent view of the lake, a pretty church right on top of Torbole. Pargheggio paid very close, though narrow road that allows the transit to one car at a time. Pargheggio recommended the one next to the small cemetery, right next to the church
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