San Lorenzo Church

Trento, Italy

Abbazia di San Lorenzo was built by Benedictine monks between 1166 and 1183. In 1778 it was turned into a prison and during the 19th a hospital and finally a military warehouse. The convent and cloister were then demolished in the Fascist era and during the Second World War the bell tower and the church suffered considerable damage.

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Details

Founded: 1166-1183
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Dela Jiustina (Della) (9 months ago)
Very beautiful
Luca Tirnusciolo (10 months ago)
The abbey was built in Trento by Benedictine monks between 1166 and 1183, coming from the Abbey of San Benedetto in Vallalta di Albino (Bergamo). Popular tradition and some bibliography say that in the place where S. Lorenzo stands there was a small temple dedicated to "Larenzia", ​​a pagan divinity, of which no trace has yet emerged. The archaeological excavations conducted between 1995 and 1998 have shown, however, that the site was frequented in Roman times, with drainage works on which buildings are set up indicating a stable occupation, probably as early as the second century. In 1955, thanks to the interest of P. Eusebio Jori, the church was restored and reopened for worship, with the title of Civic Temple. In the right arm of the transept, on the floor, there is the Mascioni opus 1170 pipe organ, built in 2005.
Zeeshan Ali (13 months ago)
Trento
Massimo Sardagna (17 months ago)
Precious monument of the Romanesque city of 1146, sadly compressed between the railway station and that of the courier. It was once part of a large monastic complex of the Benedictine fathers of Vallalta. In the thirteenth century it passed to the Dominicans who remained there until 1776. Since then the monastery was gradually converted into life imprisonment, shelter for the poor, lazaret, barracks. In the fascist era it was demolished to make room for the "house of the balillas", which in turn was demolished after the Second World War to allow the rise of the bus station. The church spared in these vicissitudes, although damaged by the bombings of the Second World War, is located a few meters lower than the current level of the surrounding terrain and this is due to the floods of the Adige and the construction works of the railway. it is of limestone in the lower part, while at the top it ends with the brick. The interior, bare and severe, is very impressive. It has three naves and the presbytery with three apses is found relative to them. The vault is frescoed with the simple decoration of the 13th century Dominican star. It preserves statues of the sculptor Luigi Degasperi and stained glass windows by Remo Wolf.
Angela Nardo (2 years ago)
Church with essential lines, which helps meditation. Excellent acoustics, perfect for performances with historical instruments. Place that deserves to be lived, not just visited.
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