Podmaine Monastery

Budva, Montenegro

Serbian Orthodox Podmaine Monastery was built in the 15th century by the Crnojević noble. The monastery has two churches, smaller and older church of Presentation of the Mother of God was built by Crnojević noble family in the 15th century while bigger church (of Dormition of the Mother of God) was built in 1747.

The name Podmaine (Pod-Maine) means beneath Maine. Maine was a small tribe with territory below Lovćen, between Stanjevići Monastery and Budva. The monastery was the gathering place of the tribe, who traditionally held meetings on the feast day of St. George.

Metropolitan Danilo I Petrović-Njegoš died in Podmaine Monastery in 1735. He was buried in the monastery but his remnants were later moved to Cetinje. Dositej Obradović lived several months in this monastery when he visited Boka in 1764.

In 1830 Petar II Petrović-Njegoš, based on the request of the emperor of Russia, sold Podmaine Monastery and Stanjevići Monastery together with their estates to the Austrian Empire.

Frescoes in the Church of St. Petka were painted by Rafail Dimitrijević from Risan in 1747 and Nicholaos Aspioti from Corfu. The monastery was burned down in 1869. In the 1979 earthquake the monastery was significantly damaged and in 2002 it was completely rebuilt and new frescoes were painted in the smaller church. According to some views one of the frescoes titled Sinful bishops and emperors presents a former Yugoslav leader Tito and heads of the uncanonical Montenegrin Orthodox Church as damned and handed over to devils who herd them down into hell in a modern version of the Last Judgment.

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Address

Mainski put, Budva, Montenegro
See all sites in Budva

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lauren Presler (2 years ago)
The most peaceful and beautiful place in all of Budva. I can't wait to come back to Montenegro again and visit the monastery every time.
Mladen Borovič (2 years ago)
It's a bit hidden, and I wasn't sure if I'm walking on private property to get to it.
Ljubomir Rradonjic (2 years ago)
Oksana Veber (2 years ago)
Beautiful quiet place above Budva
Samvel Martirosyan (2 years ago)
Lovely place
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