Savina Monastery is a Serbian Orthodox monastery of three churches located in one of the most beautiful parts of the northern Montenegrin coast. It was founded by Stjepan Vukčić Kosača, the Duke of Saint Sava (r. 1448–1466).

The small Church of the Assumption is 10m high and 6m wide. Its foundation dates to 1030, although the oldest record of it is from 1648. Its reconstruction began in the late 17th century, with the arrival of refugee monks from Tvrdoš Monastery in Herzegovina, and it was completed in 1831.The Great Temple of the Assumption was built between the 1777 and 1799, and builder was a master Nikola Foretić from the island of Korčula.The Church of St. Sava, built by Saint Sava, located outside the monastery complex.

The monastery has a large number of relics originating from the time of the Nemanjić dynasty (relics of Empress Jelena, cross of Saint Sava), including those transferred from Tvrdoš Monastery.

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Herceg Novi, Montenegro
See all sites in Herceg Novi

Details

Founded: 1030
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Poprzan (2 years ago)
Quiet and peaceful, very spiritual..
Florin Dinu (2 years ago)
We came after closing hours (8pm) and it was still opened, nobody rushed us. Parking inside.
Djordje Vicentijevic (2 years ago)
Serbian monastery with extraordenary arhitecture in a beautifull forest of Herceg Novi
Carly Tambling (2 years ago)
Cafe at the top of the hill. Very nice spot away from tourists. Pretty views.
Nizar Abazid (2 years ago)
Really gorgeous pine trees! We didn't visit the church because we were dressed like tourists, and they require long sleeves and pantaloons/skirts.
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