Maguelone Cathedral stands on an isthmus between the Étang de l'Arnel lake and the Mediterranean Sea in the Gulf of Lion, which was once the site of the original city of Maguelone, opposite the present-day town of Villeneuve-lès-Maguelone.

Maguelone Cathedral was once the episcopal seat of the former Bishop of Maguelone until 1563, when the see was transferred to the newly created Bishopric of Montpellier. The cathedral, constructed when the see was returned here in the 11th century from Substantion by Bishop Arnaud (1030-1060), is a Romanesque fortified building. Although parts, such as the towers, have been demolished, the main body of the building remains functional and is a registered national monument.

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Details

Founded: 1030-1060
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Y Barcat (21 months ago)
Nice place of peace with abbay and peacocks. Restaurant where handicaped people learn how to make sweet food with Mr Brenac
Marianne C (2 years ago)
Beautiful old cathedral dating from the year 737
Ahmed Ramadi (2 years ago)
Verry Nice place un sud de France
Hans Zingg (2 years ago)
This is an extraordinary place! There is a lot of history behind this medieval church. The atmosphere on this isolated and peaceful half-island is stunning! Try to go to a concert in this church: the acoustics are great! Also try the nearby restaurant with its nice terasse and go for a stroll along the vineyards and the ponds (étangs ) toward the sandy beach!
Natthaphong Kunmahong (2 years ago)
Very nice place to visit and remember that the restaurant closes at 2.30.
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