Maguelone Cathedral stands on an isthmus between the Étang de l'Arnel lake and the Mediterranean Sea in the Gulf of Lion, which was once the site of the original city of Maguelone, opposite the present-day town of Villeneuve-lès-Maguelone.

Maguelone Cathedral was once the episcopal seat of the former Bishop of Maguelone until 1563, when the see was transferred to the newly created Bishopric of Montpellier. The cathedral, constructed when the see was returned here in the 11th century from Substantion by Bishop Arnaud (1030-1060), is a Romanesque fortified building. Although parts, such as the towers, have been demolished, the main body of the building remains functional and is a registered national monument.

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Details

Founded: 1030-1060
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

emmanuel charron (3 months ago)
Almost impossible to get there and leave. You feel very stranded. No information on anything. Very disappointing.
Jill Thorne (4 months ago)
A really nice place to cycle or walk to if in the area to look around. We didn't go inside, but outside a little tatty. The peacocks were nice to see.
Ahaeli C (5 months ago)
A beautiful place with lovely antique architecture, kept it in impeccable condition. There is a little train (which was free when we went) from the parking all the way to the beach making stops at the cathedral. The albino peacocks and peahens, which inhabit the estate all year, are lovely and their calls gives the place a very unique atmosphere. If you come at the right season, you may even see flocks of flamingos in the backwater.
Richard O'Shea (11 months ago)
Magnificent place to visit. Well worth a motorway stop
Bert Provan (2 years ago)
Café, restful, easy to walk to and far from traffic
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