Jardin Exotique de Monaco

Monaco, Monaco

The Jardin Exotique de Monaco is a botanical garden located on a cliffside in Monaco. The succulent plants were brought back from Mexico in the late 1860s. By 1895, Augustin Gastaud, who served as the Chief Gardener of the State Gardens of Monaco, grew the succulents in the Jardin St Martin.

Albert I, Prince of Monaco acquired a piece of land in Les Moneghetti in 1912. He commissioned Louis Notari, the Chief Engineer of Monaco, to build a new garden with footbridges. During the construction, Notari found a grotto underneath in 1916.

The grotto was opened to the public in 1950, but it may only be visited with specialized guides. Evidence of prehistoric human inhabitants has been found in the cave. There is a museum of Prehistoric Anthropology within the Exotic Garden displaying many of those prehistoric remains. It was founded by Prince Albert I in 1902.

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Founded: 1860s
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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JOKO MUSLIM (3 years ago)
It's a good place to escape from all the hectic atmosphere of city and enjoy the beauty of various cactus for a while. Be caution, you cannot take your baby stroller inside the garden.
Micha Baumgartner (3 years ago)
Usually i'm not a big fan of those botanic gardens but this place is absolutely awesome. It is a very relaxed and calm area in the heart of the city.
Arun N (3 years ago)
Good place to go solo or with family. Beautify kept cactus in a green park! Lots of us and downs the stairs. Lovely sights of the monaco downtown!
Francis Tay (3 years ago)
An Eden amongst all botanical garden in Europe. A suspended garden, nestled between rock and vegetation, with a series of bridges, archways and narrow walk paths amidst hundred of species of outlandishly shaped exotic plants and cacti. This jardin exotique perched on the edge of a cliff, overlooking the principality of Monaco offering a breathtaking panoramic view stretching between the French and Italian Riviera's. It is an absolute must visit for any tourist coming to Monaco. Highly recommended.
Terence Lee (3 years ago)
Truly a one of a kind park. They now offer the "Museum Oceanographic + Exotic Garden" combo ticket for €10 for students which was just perfect for us as we were planning to visit both places. I would also recommend going the to cave tour which happens on the hour almost every hour. Even if you're not impressed by the exotic and exquisite plants, the views you can get of the cliffs of the French Riviera should at least make it worth it.
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Walled city of Jajce

The Walled City of Jajce is a medieval fortified nucleus of Jajce in Bosnia and Herzegovina, with citadel high above town on top of pyramidal-shaped steep hill, enclosed with approximately 1,300 metres long defensive walls,. It is one of the best preserved fortified capitals of the Bosnian Kingdom, the last stronghold before the kingdom dissolved under the pressure of military advancement at the onset of Ottoman Empire takeover.

The entire complex of the Walled city of Jajce, with the citadel, city ramparts, watchtower Medvjed-kula, and two main city gate-towers lies on the southern slope of a large rocky pyramid at the confluence of the rivers Pliva and Vrbas, enclosed by these rivers from the south-southwest, with the bed of the Pliva, and east-southeast by the river Vrbas gorge.

History

The fortress was built by Hrvoje Vukčić Hrvatinić, the founder of Jajce. However, the city became the seat of the Bosnian kings, hence the royal coat of arms decoration on the citadel entrance. A part of the wall was built by the Hungarian King, while the Ottomans erected the powder magazine. The walls are high and the castle was built on a hill that is egg shaped, the rivers Pliva and Vrbas also protect the castle. There is no rampart on the south and west.

Jajce was first built in the 14th century and served as the capital of the independent Kingdom of Bosnia during its time. The town has gates as fortifications, as well as a castle with walls which lead to the various gates around the town. About 10–20 kilometres from Jajce lies the Komotin Castle and town area which is older but smaller than Jajce. It is believed the town of Jajce was previously Komotin but was moved after the Black Death.

The first reference to the name of Jajce in written sources is from the year 1396, but the fortress had already existed by then. Jajce was the residence of the last Bosnian king Stjepan Tomasevic; the Ottomans besieged the town and executed him, but held it only for six months, before the Hungarian King Matthias Corvinus seized it at the siege of Jajce and established the Banovina of Jajce.

Skenderbeg Mihajlović besieged Jajce in 1501, but without success because he was defeated by Ivaniš Korvin assisted by Zrinski, Frankopan, Karlović and Cubor.

During this period, Queen Catherine restored the Saint Mary"s Church in Jajce, today the oldest church in town. Eventually, in 1527, Jajce became the last Bosnian town to fall to Ottoman rule. The town then lost its strategic importance, as the border moved further north and west.

Jajce passed with the rest of Bosnia and Herzegovina under the administration of Austria-Hungary in 1878. The Franciscan monastery of Saint Luke was completed in 1885.

Surroundings

The Walled city of Jajce is located at the confluence of the Pliva and Vrbas rivers. It was founded and started developing in the Middle Ages and acquired its final form during the Ottoman period. There are several churches and mosques built in different times during different rules, making Jajce a rather diverse town in this aspect. It is declared National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and, as the old Jajce city core, including the waterfall, and other individual sites outside the walled city perimeter, such as the Jajce Mithraeum, it is designated as The natural and architectural ensemble of Jajce and proposed as such for inscription into the UNESCO"s World Heritage Site list. The bid for inscription is currently placed on the UNESCO Tentative list.