Catacombs of Domitilla

Rome, Italy

Close to the Catacombs of San Callisto are the large and impressive Catacombs of Domitilla (named after Saint Domitilla), spread over 15 kilometres of underground caves.

The Domitilla Catacombs are unique in that they are the oldest of Rome's underground burial networks, and the only ones to still contain bones. They are also the best preserved and one of the most extensive of all the catacombs. Included in their passages are a 2nd-century fresco of the Last Supper and other valuable artifacts. There are almost 150,000 bodies buried in the Catacombs of St. Domitilla.

They are the only catacombs that have a subterranean basilica; entrance to the catacombs is achieved through this sunken 4th-century church, at via delle Sette Chiese 282. In the past, the basilica had become unsafe, and was abandoned in the 9th century. It was rediscovered in 1593, and much of it was reconstructed in 1872.

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Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

www.domitilla.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josiah Brunette (2 years ago)
Excellent and very knowledgeable tour guide. Few things to be prepared for the catacombs are a bit brisk, a light jacket is recommended. The catacombs are dark, rocky, small, and narrow. So watch your step. Our tour guide did a very good job at looking out for our group and catering to the needs of the group. Enjoy!
Alice (2 years ago)
Good but limited. I went here as part of the City Wonders guided tours and the place was awe inspiring. I’m not sure why there is no photography allowed in this place - it seems much more historical than spiritual, especially with all of the bodies long since removed. All though the place is massive there are only a limited number of corridors that tourists can go through, which is bad because your sense of the size of the place is limited, but good because I’m sure if they let people wander through the entire place they would a) get hopelessly lost and b) vandalize and destroy what is left.
Kelly (2 years ago)
Good but limited. I went here as part of the City Wonders guided tours and the place was awe inspiring. I’m not sure why there is no photography allowed in this place - it seems much more historical than spiritual, especially with all of the bodies long since removed. All though the place is massive there are only a limited number of corridors that tourists can go through, which is bad because your sense of the size of the place is limited, but good because I’m sure if they let people wander through the entire place they would a) get hopelessly lost and b) vandalize and destroy what is left.
Elizabeth Gill (2 years ago)
They have some well preserved frescos and an ornate, beautiful, underground basilica. Our guide did not speak English very well but was able to answer our questions and provide some information. No pictures are allowed inside. The tour costs €8 and they have tours in several languages.
suricatu razvan (2 years ago)
They don t allow photos "out of respect for the dead" even though almost all tombs are empty. Just a trick to make the crowd keep moving. Also, they boast 14 km of tunnels but walk you around for 50 meters in circles. For 8 euro it s not worth it. Maybe if you re really really curious to see where regular people were buried
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