Catacombs of Commodilla

Rome, Italy

Catacombs of Commodilla, on the Via Ostiensis, contain one of the earliest images of a bearded Christ. They originally held the relics of Saints Felix and Adauctus. The hypogeum leading to the catacombs was built in the fourth century. The catacombs were used for burials until the sixth century. Later, as happened to other Christian underground cemeteries, it was transformed into a place of worship of martyrdom: restoration of the basilica underground were made by several popes until the ninth century, a sign that the catacombs were still at that time a place of pilgrimage of devout Christians.

There were also found coins bearing the effigy of Pope Gregory IV (827-844) Pope Leo IV (847-855) finally gave the relics of the martyrs Felix and Adautto the wife of Emperor Lothair. Following the catacombs were abandoned and fell into oblivion. It was discovered in 1595 by archaeologist Antonio Bosio, but the first to identify it as that of Commodilla was in the nineteenth century, Giovanni Battista de Rossi. Restoration campaigns were performed at the beginning of the twentieth century and led to the complete excavation of the second level cemetery.

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Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

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