Roman Baths

Como, Italy

Roman thermal baths in Como date back to the 1st century AD. They are situated in a large area (about 1500 square meters). Thanks to a recent renovation, they are now open to the public. Visitors can see finds and recent discoveries with specific explanations and information about the site. 

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Viale Lecco 9, Como, Italy
See all sites in Como

Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Graziano Poletti (18 months ago)
Che Como abbia bisogno di parcheggi come un moribondo dell'ossigeno(..), è una realtà più che evidente ma che si arrivi a nascondere i resti delle terme romane con un a struttura del genere, francamente mi lascia esterrefatto. Ci sono volute decine di anni prima di prendere la sofferta ed inopinata decisione, indipendentemente dal risultato attuale, di ricoprirle, non si sarebbe potuto fare qualcosa di meglio?? Lasciamo perdere le scelte estetiche degli architetti contemporanei, per la maggior parte dei casi squalificati da come hanno "crocefisso" il nostro territorio e l'ambiente urbano in questo caso. Questa è una scelta politica. Per che cosa? Qualche posto auto in più? Claustrofobiche
M C (2 years ago)
Free to visit, friendly & knowledgeable volunteer from the Italian Touring Club and surely worth visiting. Truly recommend!
sergio scotts (3 years ago)
nice place for a visit and photos.
hatem kabli (3 years ago)
Didn't like it
Tarjei Hamre (3 years ago)
not so special
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.