Roman Baths

Como, Italy

Roman thermal baths in Como date back to the 1st century AD. They are situated in a large area (about 1500 square meters). Thanks to a recent renovation, they are now open to the public. Visitors can see finds and recent discoveries with specific explanations and information about the site. 

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Address

Viale Lecco 9, Como, Italy
See all sites in Como

Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Candace Streib (2 years ago)
So fascinating
Graziano Poletti (2 years ago)
Che Como abbia bisogno di parcheggi come un moribondo dell'ossigeno(..), è una realtà più che evidente ma che si arrivi a nascondere i resti delle terme romane con un a struttura del genere, francamente mi lascia esterrefatto. Ci sono volute decine di anni prima di prendere la sofferta ed inopinata decisione, indipendentemente dal risultato attuale, di ricoprirle, non si sarebbe potuto fare qualcosa di meglio?? Lasciamo perdere le scelte estetiche degli architetti contemporanei, per la maggior parte dei casi squalificati da come hanno "crocefisso" il nostro territorio e l'ambiente urbano in questo caso. Questa è una scelta politica. Per che cosa? Qualche posto auto in più? Claustrofobiche
M C (3 years ago)
Free to visit, friendly & knowledgeable volunteer from the Italian Touring Club and surely worth visiting. Truly recommend!
sergio scotts (4 years ago)
nice place for a visit and photos.
serge schout (4 years ago)
nice place for a visit and photos.
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Kirkjubøargarður ('Yard of Kirkjubøur', also known as King"s Farm) is one of the oldest still inhabited wooden houses of the world. The farm itself has always been the largest in the Faroe Islands. The old farmhouse dates back to the 11th century. It was the episcopal residence and seminary of the Diocese of the Faroe Islands, from about 1100. Sverre I of Norway (1151–1202), grew up here and went to the priest school. The legend says, that the wood for the block houses came as driftwood from Norway and was accurately bundled and numbered, just for being set up. Note, that there is no forest in the Faroes and wood is a very valuable material. Many such wood legends are thus to be found in Faroese history.

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Other famous buildings directly by the farmhouse are the Magnus Cathedral and the Saint Olav"s Church, which also date back to the mediaeval period. All three together represent the Faroe Island"s most interesting historical site.